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Videos uploaded by user “VDEngineering”
How does a Rocket Engine (and Nozzle) Work? - Compressible Flow Basics
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 PART 2 IS LIVE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpwpzUkR3QY Hi Everyone! With the advent of SpaceX Falcon Heavy Launch, please spread this video to your friends and anyone else interested! Interested in rockets? Ever wondered how a rocket engine nozzle actually works, and why the flow looks the way it is, check out my latest video! I talk about: 1) Compressible Flow 2) Subsonic and Supersonic Nozzles 3) Rocket C-D Nozzles 4) Generation of thrust 5) Over Expanded and Under Expanded Nozzles I hope you take away some new concepts in fluid mechanics after this video. It is catered towards mechanical and aerospace engineering students with an interest in fluids. Thank you! For more videos like this, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRaiKJHsh_Ii4H-86uqXT_g?view_as=subscriber About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 31078 VDEngineering
ANSYS CFD Meshing Basics: How to create a Structured (Face) Mesh,  Part 1 - Rocket Nosecone
 
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Hey all! In this video I go over the techniques of creating a structured mesh in ANSYS Fluent CFD. The following is covered 1) Face Split 2) 2D Geometry 3) Solidworks Importing 4) Meshing 5) Element SIZING 6) Mesh BIAS 7) Mesh Inflation
Views: 14334 VDEngineering
ANSYS Workbench - Improve Meshing in 3 Easy Steps!
 
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Dear Engineers, This is a tutorial on quickly improving a 2D mesh in ANSYS. It contains. 1) Face Meshing 2) Sizing 3) Setting the number of elements. Thank you, have a good day! Vin
Views: 13567 VDEngineering
How Does An Aerospike Rocket Engine Work? Are They Worth It? - Explained in DETAIL
 
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Hi Everyone! I am sure that if you are a space enthusiast, you must have heard of a new startup company ARCA Space, based out of New Mexico. This company plans to build a rocket which is powered by an aerospike engine. However, most of you might not be familiar with how an aerospike rocket nozzle works, so check out this video! An aerospike nozzle works in the same way as a typical rocket nozzle. The principles of supersonic compressible flow apply, and the flow expansion behaviour is identical to a bell nozzle. The major difference here is that the aerospike nozzle is shaped opposite to a bell nozzle, thus providing further expansion to the flow (due to the increase in available area). This provided a host of benefits namely: 1) Expanding the flow further to compensate for the underexpanded situation typically occuring at high altitudes. 2) Increasing the momentum of the flow so that the plume stays in the vicinity of the center of the rocket, eliminating base drag. 3) Providing a means to keep the plume narrow and long for the overexpanded nozzle situation (reducing base drag further). My video going into more detail on how a typical (bell shaped) rocket engine nozzle works can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zagXTc4hBk For more engineering videos, as well as tutorials and tips and tricks, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes VDEngineering
Views: 2025 VDEngineering
ANSYS Fluid Structure Interaction tutorial (One Way FSI)
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 Hello, Here is a tutorial on performing a FSI in ANSYS. This basically means importing forces from a FLUENT (or CFX) CFD simulation into an FEA simulation in ANSYS Mechanical. There are not very many clear tutorials on how to do this. In reality, it is actually very simple, however some caution is required when meshing the geometry. Let me know if you have any questions, Let's hit 500 subscribers by the end of 2017! Regards, ____________ Tags: ANSYS, Fluent, CFD, FEA, FSI
Views: 9535 VDEngineering
ANSYS CFD Meshing Basics: How to create a Structured (Face) Mesh, Part 2 - Wedge
 
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Hey all! PART 2 of this video covers a wedge. To see part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lx_kjZiKREk
Views: 4638 VDEngineering
How does a Rocket Engine Nozzle Work (Part 2) - What are "Shock (or MACH) Diamonds"?
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 Hi Everyone! Welcome to Part 2 of my Rocket Engine Videos! This video is MUCH more informative and covers a LOT more interesting content than Part 1. If you missed PART 1 you can find it here at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zagXTc4hBk&t=1s Have you ever seen a diamond like air pattern outside of a fighter jet afterburner or a rocket engine and wondered why that happens? These shock diamonds are typically seen in images of the SR-71 Blackbird and other supersonic aircraft. In addition, you can see these shocks in rocket engines tested at low altitudes. These diamond like shocks are oblique shocks which form due to the over expanded conditions of the nozzle. Over expanded simply means that the pressure of the air at the exit is much lesser than the pressure outside (ambient). This causes shock waves to form to try and maintain the pressure equilibrium in the flow. This video describes in detail, how these shocks are formed. If you are interested in jet & rocket propulsion, this video is a must see! In brief this video covers, 1) Shock Diamonds (why they form) 2) Oblique Shocks 3) Expansion 4) Nozzle Theory 5) Over Expanded Nozzles For more engineering videos, as well as simulation tutorials, tips and tricks, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes, VDEngineering About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 5699 VDEngineering
ANSYS Fluent: Rocket Engine Nozzle (With Exhaust Plume) - Detailed & Accurate CFD Tutorial
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 Dear Engineers, A rocket engine nozzle typically consists of a combustion chamber set at a very high pressure and temperature. The flow then accelerates through the nozzle, reaching a supersonic (higher than the speed of sound) value at the exit of the nozzle. This is the driving mechanism which accelerates rockets into space. Nozzles for rockets are designed for a specific thrust using the Method of Characteristics, a very popular engineering tool. Here is a detailed tutorial explaining how to perform a compressible flow CFD (computational fluid dynamic) simulation through a rocket engine nozzle in 2D, using the ANSYS Fluent CFD software. This tutorial takes you through the whole process of designing a rocket nozzle namely: Flow conditions, Geometry (created in SOLIDWORKS), boundary conditions, meshing, setting up, solving the CFD, and post-processing (CFD Post). Without a doubt, meshing is undoubtedly the most challenging part of the simulation. Keep in mind as compressible flows normally have shocks and detached flow situations, as a result the mesh needs to be highly accurate and preferably structured (i.e each element can be located with coordinates). To achieve this, use the Number of Divisions, Bias, Element Quantity features which are embedded in ANSYS. You need to select the nozzle wall, inlet region, throat, and outlet region sections and set the elements individually. To facilitate this, you will need to use the 'Face Split' feature in the Geometry section to break up your domain into a number of sections. For more CFD tutorials, engineering tips and tricks, and other fun stuff.. visit my channel VDEngineering Best Wishes, VDEngineering MUSIC: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCht8qITGkBvXKsR1Byln-wA/videos About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 12389 VDEngineering
MATLAB ode45: How To Solve a System of Ordinary Differential Equations  (ODE - with discrete data)
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 Engineers! In this video, I cover a full example of solving a system of two first order ordinary differential equations (ODEs), in MATLAB, using the ODE45 command. I also cover how to use discrete data, interpolation, and passing parameters. This video covers: 1) Import Excel data into MATLAB (xlsread) 2) Interpolate Discrete data (interp1) 3) Pass parameters between files into an equation. (ode45) 4) Solve an ode using the ode45 command in MATLAB. (ode45) Thank you for watching! TAGS: How to solve a system of ODE in MATLAB? How to pass parameters within an ODE in MATLAB? How to solve an ODE with discrete data? About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 11117 VDEngineering
5 Quick Tips For More Accurate Airfoil CFD Simulations (ANSYS Fluent Tutorial)
 
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Dear Engineers! If you are a student in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering, there will be a time where you learn about airfoils, CFD (fluid dynamics) and simulation. CFD is a very common tool to simulate flow over airfoils. That being said, there are important factors you must consider in order to obtain an accurate simulation (shown in ANSYS in this case). Here are five tips to help you get the most out of your simulation. The first tip is to use a structured mesh. In comparison to typical meshes, a structured mesh is highly accurate in the sense that it can be fine tuned near areas of interest. For example, this could be a boundary layer region (i.e. a wall), or a nose cone, or any region where the flow experiences a change in momentum. In addition, structured meshes generate significantly faster than a typical unstructured mesh as each element can be pinpointed in space using Cartesian Coordinates. The second tip is to use a larger flow domain to prevent backpressure from bouncing off the wall and creating a non-zero potential flow region at the airfoil. The third tip is to use the Spalart-Allmaras Turbulence model. In general, it is recommended to use a turbulence model regardless of whether you are simulating rarefied high temperature flows (where density is low), or flows in gases where the viscosity can be neglected. Moreover, it is actually imperative that you use a turbulence model in very high speed rarefied flows as the viscous dissipation effects need to be accounted for. When it comes to airfoils, the Spalart-Allmaras turbuelence model can be employed as it does not require a highly accurate mesh to provide good results. Next, an important procedure to verify your simulation is to check the Wall Y+ Value. This value is used to characterize flow near the turbulent boundary layer, and it tells you how the wall shear stress has been computed. The goal is to achieve a Y+ value either in the single digits (0-10) or a very high value (50+). The Y+ value is a dimensionless value which plays a direct role in the subsequent calculation of lift and drag coefficients for an airfoil. In the case that your Y+ values are not satisfactory, this brings us to the final tip which is to use Mesh Adaptation. Most CFD programs can do this within a click of a button. Use the "Adapt Boundary" feature in ANSYS Fluent to achieve this. The mesh near the wall will be split into more regions, hence creating a denser grid near the wall. This in turn will provide better results for your Y+ value, and more accurate results for your overall simulation. I hope you find this video helpful. I wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year (from Canada). Let us reach 2000 subscribers by the end of 2018! For more engineering tutorials, tips and tricks, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes, VDEngineering About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 2105 VDEngineering
ANSYS FLUENT: How to Quickly Verify a CFD Simulation
 
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To All Engineers involved in CFD and fluid mechanics, as well as University Students, Here is a short tutorial on quickly validating a CFD Simulation in ANSYS FLUENT. Please note that I do not specifically show you how to mesh and perform the simulation. Instead, I focus on validating the simulation which is an equally important skill, especially for those of you working on projects where simulation accuracy is paramount. Please do not hesitate to leave any questions in the comments below. Tags: ANSYS, Fluent, CFD, Validation, Simulation, Fluid Mechanics, Mesh, SST, Turbulence, Spalart-Allmaras Subscribe for more videos!
Views: 3534 VDEngineering
ANSYS Quick Tip: Import 2D Geometry from Solidworks (or any other CAD software)
 
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Hi Everyone! This is a quick tip on importing 2D CAD files into ANSYS for your simulation purposes. For more videos like this, make sure to subscribe and turn on notifications! For videos on engineering, simulations, subscribe to this channel at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678
Views: 704 VDEngineering
MATLAB & Simulink Lecture: The Aerospace Blockset (Walkthrough + 2 Examples)
 
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PART 2 IS HERE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdJ0LAkIDqk LINKING SIMULINK AND FLIGHTGEAR: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jB-80cvV1Ao&t=611s SIMULINK / FLIGHTGEAR LAUNCH SIMULATION: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z34kNG0DTso ROCKET LAUNCH SIMULATION TUTORIAL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLFwALWAbx8 CAD MODELS TO FLIGHTGEAR: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wb9bzS80ThA&t=529s Dear Engineers & Engineering students, Welcome to my first lecture on MATLAB, Simulink and the Aerospace Blockset If you are interested in working in the aerospace or autonomous vehicle industry, you will inevitably have to learn MATLAB and Simulink. In additon, you will be expected to have knowledge with this software as a control systems engineer. The Aerospace Blockset provides the backbone for building high fidelity flight simulations, flight control law verification & validation, algorithm development & testing. It consists of many features which when used together; can simulate every single subsystem of an aircraft or launch vehicle. This lecture provides an overview of the various tools available within Simulink & Aerospace Blockset, then provides two examples. One example was developed in MATLAB and the other was made by myself. I hope you learn something new regarding flight simulation from this video! For more engineering videos, tutorials, simulations as well as tips & tricks, be sure to subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes VDEngineering About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 3743 VDEngineering
Rocket Science 101 | What are the various types of Rocket Fuels? (For Beginners)
 
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Hey Everyone! Are you interested in rockets and space? Then check out my new video explaining the four different kinds of rocket fuel! This video covers the fundamentals of: solid, hybrid, liquid, and electric rocket propulsion. I attempted to keep it short and simple so that anybody will be able to understand the concepts, whether they are from a technical background or not. If you have any questions/comments/feedback, please don't hesitate to leave it in the comments. Take care! Vin CREDITS: NASA: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Shuttle SpaceX: http://www.spacex.com/news/2013/10/14/upgraded-falcon-9-mission-overview ULA: http://www.ulalaunch.com/products_atlasv.aspx Solid Rockets: https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/393-types-of-chemical-rocket-engines Liquid Rockets: https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/images/411-liquid-rocket-engine Hybrid Rockets: http://www.spacesafetymagazine.com/aerospace-engineering/rocketry/hybrid-rockets-overview/ Electric Propulsion: http://currentpropulsionsystems.weebly.com/electromagnetic-propulsion-systems.html MUSIC: ALL MUSIC HAS BEEN TAKEN FROM THIS CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCht8qITGkBvXKsR1Byln-wA/videos NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED
Views: 1299 VDEngineering
MATLAB & Simulink Tutorial: Quadrotor UAV Trajectory and Control Design (PID + Cascaded)
 
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Hi Everyone, In this video I walk you through designing and implementing a 2D linear controller for a quad rotor moving along a specified trajectory. The quad is commanded to move across a trajectory defined as a function of time x(t), z(t). The equations of motion are first linearized and then implemented in Simulink. This tutorial covers the following fundamental control concepts 1) Linearization 2) Under-actuation 3) Coupling 4) PID/PD/PI control 5) Tuning 6) Inner Loop Control Feel free to leave your feedback below. For more videos like this, tutorials, and tips & tricks, subscribe to this channel at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes VDEngineering About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 1910 VDEngineering
How Rocket Engine Nozzle Walls are Designed (Method of Characteristics) - OVERVIEW
 
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Hi Everyone! So why do rocket engines have a curvy wall shape? Why is the nozzle not straight edged? Well here's your answer! The Method of Characteristics (MOC) is a popular tool used to design liquid and solid rocket engine nozzles. Even hybrid rockets use this tool to design a nozzle. Feel free to post your feedback and /or questions in the comments below. For more videos like this, tutorials, tips & tricks, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678
Views: 541 VDEngineering
How To Connect MATLAB and Simulink to FlightGear - Full Tutorial for Beginners
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 Dear Engineers, In this video, I go over thoroughly, the process to install FlightGear and to connect MATLAB to it. FlightGear is an open source flight simulator which is used for the simulation of aircraft dynamics. It is a very powerful tool used in the aerospace industry worldwide. In this tutorial, I cover: 1) Setting up FlightGear 2) Installing new aircraft 3) Connecting MATLAB to FlightGear (in full step by step detail) I would sincerely like to thank a PhD graduate from Georgia Institute of Technology, in helping me extensively with this process: His contact information is: Imon Chakraborty, Ph.D., Research Engineer II, Aerospace Systems Design Laboratory, School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA LINKS USED IN THE VIDEO: FlightGear: http://www.flightgear.org/download/ MATLAB Compatibility: https://www.mathworks.com/help/aeroblks/release-notes.html?requestedDomain=www.mathworks.com New Aircraft: http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/flightgear/ftp/ Code Tutorial: http://www-mdp.eng.cam.ac.uk/web/CD/engapps/flightgear/getstart.pdf MY CODE: ________________________________________________________________ SET FG_ROOT=C:\Program Files\FlightGear\data SET FG_SCENERY=C:\Program Files\FlightGear\data\Scenery;C:\Program Files\FlightGear\scenery;C:\Program Files\FlightGear\terrasync .\\bin\win64\fgfs --aircraft=HL21 --fdm=null --enable-auto-coordination --native-fdm=socket,in,30,localhost,5502,udp --fog-disable --enable-clouds3d --start-date-lat=2004:06:01:09:00:00 --enable-sound --visibility=15000 --in-air --prop:/engines/engine0/running=true --disable-freeze --airport=KMIA --runway=06 --altitude=8000 --heading=0 --offset-distance=0 --offset-azimuth=0 --enable-rembrandt __________________________________________________________ Thank you for watching! Do not hesitate to leave your questions in the comments below, or DM me. Best wishes, Vin About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 8151 VDEngineering
How to Read and Use Joysticks in MATLAB and Simulink - Step-by-step detailed example!
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 Dear Engineering students, Welcome to my all new tutorial on using a basic USB joystick in MATLAB / Simulink. For this specific tutorial, you must have Simulink 3D Animation installed. However to use a joystick in general, you do not need 3D Animation. This tutorial covers: 1) Setting up a simple USB joystick 2) Knowing which Simulink blocks use a joystick 3) Using the fundamental joystick controls (yaw, pitch, roll) 4) Mapping joystick axis motion to a CAD file within the VRML world. 5) Testing!! Note: If you have no experience with Simulink 3D Animation, I highly recommend watch my previous videos explaining the following in more detail. - VR Signal Expander - Basic coordinates in Simulink 3D Animation A lot of people I notice on MATLAB forums as well as YouTube, have difficulty knowing exactly how to import a joystick and map the joystick axes. Stay tuned for upcoming videos: - Importing ASSEMBLIES in VRML - Joystick + PID control Cheers, Vin Joystick used: Logitech Freedom 2.4 Cordless How to use Simulink 3D Animation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--9d8jYzLpg About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 7433 VDEngineering
ANSYS FLUENT CFD: Supersonic Flow, Oblique Shocks, and Expansion Waves Tutorial
 
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Dear Engineers, In most supersonic flows, shock waves occur as the fluid goes past the object. There are two types of phenomena, an oblique shock (when the flow hits a convex corner) and an expansion wave (when the flow goes through a concave corner). This has a resulting effect on the velocity, pressure, and temperature of the fluid and can lead to increased drag if the aircraft is not designed (i.e. streamlined) properly. Here is a detailed tutorial explaining how to perform a compressible flow CFD (computational fluid dynamic) simulation on a rocket fin, generating oblique shocks and expansion waves. To facilitate this, you will need to use the 'Face Split' feature in the Geometry section to break up your domain into a number of sections. For more CFD tutorials, engineering tips and tricks, and other fun stuff.. visit my channel VDEngineering. Best Wishes, VDEngineering
Views: 1621 VDEngineering
ANSYS FLUENT: Supersonic Airfoil on Structured Mesh (Compressible CFD Tutorial)
 
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Mechanical and Aerospace Engineers! Typical commercial aircraft have an airfoil which is subsonic, i.e. the flow is streamlined in order to obtain a higher pressure at the bottom and a lower pressure at the top. This is the fundamental cause of lift. However, for supersonic flight, the flow tends to 'compress' and 'expand' since the high Mach Number (airspeed relative to the speed of sound) tends to crush (or expand) the air flying in front of the aircraft. When a supersonic flow turns a concave corner, it creates an oblique shock. The airspeed is reduced, however there is an increase in pressure and temperature. When the flow turns a convex corner, the reverse occurs. A supersonic airfoil is designed in order to achieve a higher pressure at the bottom and a lower pressure at the top, just like any other airfoil. This condition must be achieved regardless, to generate a positive upward force on the aircraft. However, supersonic airfoils take advantage of oblique shocks and expansion waves to achieve this effect. The bottom leading edge is designed to create an oblique shock which leads to an increase in pressure and a decrease in velocity. I walk you through a full example of a CFD simulation supersonic airfoil. This may be helpful if you are a student in Aerospace or Mechanical Engineering. In order to follow along better, you will be better off going over 'Isentropic Flow Relation' formulas which can be available anywhere, as well as Part 1 of this video where I cover the theory. These are standard methods used for compressible flow calculations. Link to Part 1 where I cover supersonic airfoil theory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOnHCK58u-Y&t=35s ____________________ For more engineering tutorials, tips and tricks, subscribe to this channel at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes, VDEngineering
Views: 1698 VDEngineering
STS Rocket Launch Simulation Algorithm Tutorial with MATLAB (Using Euler's Method ODE's)
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 CODE: https://www.dropbox.com/s/fmp4hplw8dw7zjv/shuttle_model.m?dl=0 Hi Everyone! If you are interested in rockets as well as programming, then this video is a MUST see for you! I teach you how to program a flight simulation of the NASA Space Shuttle launch using MATLAB. The Euler's method is utilized here as it is a popular method used for solving ordinary differential equations or ODE's. The flight of a rocket launch can be described by four ODE's. This rocket launch includes the gravity turn mechanism which is required in order to fly the rocket parallel to the ground. This way, the rocket is then able to release it's payload directly into orbit. The algorithm covers the following mathematical concepts mainly: 1) Euler's Method 2) Spline Interpolation 3) Arrays and Array operations 4) For and While Loops 5) If-Else statements The algorithm can be implemented into any programming language (C, C++, Python, JAVA etc.) After explaining the algorithm, I then show you a simulation of the results in the FlightGear Open Source Simulator. It is possible to connect MATLAB to a number of flight simulators namely FlightGear, X-Plane, as well as Microsoft FS. To learn how to connect MATLAB and FlightGear, you can watch my previous video here at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jB-80cvV1Ao I hope you enjoyed this video. I had performed this simulation a year ago, and am now releasing it to help you all who are passionate about this field! For more engineering videos, as well as simulation tutorials, tips and tricks, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes VDEngineering
Views: 1657 VDEngineering
ANSYS: Rocket Nozzle FSI (coupled Thermal Structural) & Harmonic Analysis Tutorial
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 HOW A ROCKET ENGINE WORKS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zagXTc4hBk&t=5s HOW A ROCKET NOZZLE WORKS (PART 2): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpwpzUkR3QY&t=72s HOW TO LAND A ROCKET: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAzpg0P8NhE&t=73s Dear Engineers & Engineering students, With the advent of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Launch, there is no better time to release this video! If you are interested in simulations of rocket engine nozzles, this video is for you. I teach you how to perform a detailed CFD (fluid dynamics), FEA (structural analysis) as well as combined thermo-structural interactions. This means taking the load from a CFD simulation and importing it into the structural analysis. Pressure loads are also applied using isentropic flow relations for a rocket nozzle. Multiple ANSYS tools are required to carry out the simulation namely: 1) Face Split 2) Geometry Slicing 3) MultiZone meshing A pre-stressed harmonic analysis is also performed here. A harmonic load is simply a load which is time-dependant (i.e. acceleration with a frequency). You can see an example of harmonic loading from the SpaceX Falcon 9 User's Manual (in the Environment section). I hope you learn something new in ANSYS from this video! For more engineering videos, tutorials, simulations as well as tips & tricks, be sure to subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes VDEngineering
Views: 2493 VDEngineering
How to Import 3D CAD Models into a Flight Simulator (Solidworks to Simulink to FlightGear)
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 HL-20 DESIGN TEMPLATE: https://www.dropbox.com/s/k44inwglvqme26m/HL20.zip?dl=0 The contents of that file belong to the MathWorks Inc (1995-2005), and I do not intend any copyright infringement. The aircraft can be also found on other websites. ___________________________________________________________ Please watch with headphones and in 1080p. The audio will be the most clearer in that way. To All Engineering students and those working in the Aerospace Industry: This video will be of great help for your aircraft designs! In this video, I walk you through the detailed process of importing an Aircraft 3D design (created in Solidworks), into the popular open source flight simulator, FlightGear. The process is not difficult at all, however it can be tricky and took me a while to figure out. I also talk about new Aerospace programs in this video, it is meant to serve as an informative tool to those working in the Aerospace and Defense Industries all around the World! I hope you learn a lot from this video. Please leave a comment if you have any questions. My E-mail: [email protected] LINKS: AIAA Design Build Fly: http://www.aiaadbf.org/ FlightGear: http://www.flightgear.org/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8FsAH6SLes AMRDEC: https://www.amrdec.army.mil/amrdec/ AMRDEC Helios Program: http://www.dtic.mil/ndia/2011physics/Wednesday13272_Strawn.pdf Sierra Nevada Corporation Dream Chaser: http://www.sncspace.com/ProductLines/SpaceExplorationSystems HL-20 Personnel Launch System: https://www.nasa.gov/centers/langley/news/factsheets/HL-20.html HOW TO INTERFACE MATLAB / FLIGHTGEAR: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jB-80cvV1Ao&t=67s Have a great day! TAGS: AMRDEC, CAD, FlightGear, MATLAB, Simulink, X-Plane
Views: 3721 VDEngineering
Hypersonic Flight: How A Supersonic Wind Tunnel Works (For Beginners)
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 Hi Everyone! So there has been trending news regarding supersonic flight & hypersonic weapons which are already developed by Russia and China. There has also been information flowing around that the US is lagging in hypersonic technology and needs to catch up. Don't even bother mentioning Canada. I am lost for words that we don't even have our own rocket program yet. With this all new talk about hypersonic weapons and aircraft, there is no better time to release my new video on how a supersonic wind tunnel works. This type of wind tunnel is used extensively to test supersonic and high speed aircraft / rockets / missiles etc. I go into full scientific detail of how such a tunnel works. As we progress forward, supersonic flight will inevitably become a reality as new aircraft manufacturers (startups) (Boom.Aero, Spike Aerospace, Aerion Corporation, Lockheed QueSST (Quiet Supersonic Transport)) are independantly developing their supersonic aircraft which can fly up to Mach 2+. Hence, supersonic wind tunnels will also have to be designed to support the development of these aircraft. This video is an extension of my Rocket Engine Nozzle series as supersonic wind tunnels are simply two rocket nozzles connected back to back with a test section in between! Check it out! Best Wishes VDEngineering
Views: 1046 VDEngineering
How to Land A Rocket? The Basics (SpaceX & Blue Origin)
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 Hi Everyone! Interested in how a rocket lands? Curious to know how exactly SpaceX and Blue Origin land their rockets? Check out this quick video on how to land a rocket. There are two fundamental mechanisms rockets use to land which are: 1) Supersonic Retropropulsion 2) Alignment of the stage using Cold Gas Thrusters. This video covers both in brief detail. Hope you enjoy watching! My video going into more detail on how a rocket engine works can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zagXTc4hBk For more engineering videos, as well as tutorials and tips and tricks, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes VDEngineering
Views: 423 VDEngineering
ANSYS Mechanical APDL: How to Mesh with Triangle Elements? - Plane Stress FEA Tutorial
 
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If you are using ANSYS for your assignments or projects, and have trouble creating triangular meshes, please watch this video. This is a recording from one of my in class projects, as a result there is no music or intro.
Views: 760 VDEngineering
Introduction to Simulink 3D Animation using MATLAB and V-Realm Builder - Part 1
 
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Dear Mechanical and Aerospace engineers/students, Welcome to my first tutorial on how to use the 3D Animation feature in MATLAB. This tutorial will cover 1) Configuring V-Realm Builder 2) Importing a CAD file from Solidworks as a VRML format into your World. 3) Adding transform nodes, setting up a cool VRML scene. 4) Adding VRML cameras and viewpoints within your World Part 2 will cover 1) Linking your world into a MATLAB / Simulink file, animating your object within one degree of freedom.
Views: 11775 VDEngineering
MATLAB & Simulink Tutorial - Design a Simple Autopilot (with Flight Simulation!)
 
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HOW TO CONNECT MATLAB TO FLIGHTGEAR! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jB-80cvV1Ao&t=806s This video walks you through building a simple longitudinal autopilot to control the pitch motion of an airplane. The content covered includes: 1) PID Control 2) PID Tuning 3) Basic Simulink functions 4) Visualizing your simulation with FlightGear Thanks for watching and Happy Thanksgiving! Reference: http://ctms.engin.umich.edu/CTMS/index.php?example=AircraftPitch&section=SimulinkModeling About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 502 VDEngineering
How to import and animate 3D CAD Assemblies using MATLAB / Simulink 3D Animation
 
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Dear Engineers, Welcome to my video explaining how you can animate CAD Assemblies in MATLAB via Solidworks. What's covered in this video 1) Creating 3D CAD Assembly in Solidworks 2) Exporting to VRML/STL while keeping constraints 3) Scanning the assembly into MATLAB 4) Motion for the whole assembly as well as individual components. You will need: 1) Simscape Multibody (The MATLAB Forum has an excellent tutorial on installing this.) 2) Solidworks 3) MATLAB (with Simulink 3D Animation) NOTE: This is NOT a tutorial on SimMechanics. This is Simulink 3D Animation. It is a lot more robust and is used mainly for long distance motion. SimMechanics is for mainly modeling systems which do not move, however there is internal motion. Simulink 3D Animation is used for modeling and simulation of launch vehicles, ground vehicles, and more. Equations of motion need not be known, and control laws are also defined. Most of Simulink 3D Animation features can NOT be used in SimMechanics, such as creating custom worlds, hypersonic motion, etc. The video which explains VRML in more detail is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--9d8jYzLpg
Views: 3285 VDEngineering
Aerospike Rocket Nozzle (With Exhaust Plume): ANSYS Fluent Detailed Tutorial
 
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Mechanical and Aerospace Engineers! Before you watch this video, it is recommended that you watch my video on how to simulate flow in a typical rocket engine. The concepts are identical and the simulation techniques are the same: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oY_3_c0rDiw&t=466s With that being said... Are you interested in aerospike nozzles? Interested in learning how to simulate flow around them for your design projects? An aerospike nozzle is a new type of rocket engine primarily meant to improve efficiency at high altitudes. It serves this purpose by expanding the flow and accelerating it, hence improving the resulting exhaust plume. Why expansion? You know that in typical rocket engines, the exhaust plume gets expanded rapidly since the ambient (outside air) pressure is significantly smaller than the pressure at the exit of the nozzle. This is called an underexpanded condition and is not optimal for thrust. An aerospike engine seeks to compensate for this by further expanding the flow. The resulting thrust is much higher when this occurs as the pressure differential is minimized. This simulation performed in ANSYS Fluent CFD shows you in detail, how to model flow on an aerospike nozzle. To understand in more detail, the flow at the ENTRY of the aerospike nozzle portion must be SUPERSONIC, as only a supersonic flow can create shocks at an expansion point. Keep in mind that an aerospike nozzle is an addition to a typical converging-diverging nozzle. It does not act to serve as a total replacement (i.e. you must have supersonic flow generated in the first place and this can only be accomplished by an aerospike nozzle). My video going into more detail on how a typical (bell shaped) rocket engine nozzle works can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zagXTc4hBk For more engineering videos, as well as tutorials and tips and tricks, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes VDEngineering About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 3035 VDEngineering
ANSYS Fluent: How To Perform Accurate CFD of Turbulent Flows (Pipe Bend Example)
 
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Hi Everyone, In this video I walk you through performing and verifying the accuracy of turbulent flows. This example covers internal turbulent flow through a pipe bend. This video covers: 1) 2D Geometry Creation 2) Face Meshing 3) Verifying Turbulence (Wall Y Plus) FACE MESHING: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lx_kjZiKREk&t=5s AIRFOIL SIMULATIONS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBmcQtjzxbI Subscribe to this channel for more videos like this!
Views: 550 VDEngineering
How Do Hypersonic Aircraft (Scramjets) Create Thrust?
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 Hi Everyone! Scramjets are a type of hypersonic vehicle which are designed to operate at very high Mach Numbers (M more than 5). Hypersonic aircraft are currently in development by several organizations worldwide. This video will go into detail of how a scramjet generates thrust. To begin, let's look at how a car engine or jet engine works. There are mainly four cycles (Intake, Compression, Combustion, and Exhaust). During intake, air enters the engine, compression occurs by means of a piston-cylinder mechanism in a car engine, or through compressor blades in a jet engine. Combustion is the addition of fuel which gives the air energy and creates a high rise in temperature. Finally, expansion is the process of which air is expelled back into the atmosphere. Pressure is reduced during this process and the air velocity is increased. Scramjets follow an identical cycle however, the phenomena occurs differently. 1) Intake: Air is ingested through a lip. 2) Compression: Multiple oblique shocks occur since the inlet is designed with varying angles. When a supersonic compressible fluid experiences a converging area (incoming change in angle), it creates an oblique shock wave. This shock wave compresses the flow to a higher pressure along with decelerating it. 3) Combustion: Fuel is added to this compressed air at low velocity. This phenomenon is known as Rayleigh Flow in fluid mechanics. Rayleigh Flow simply refers to flow with heat transfer. 4) Expansion: The air expands through a nozzle which works just as a Rocket Engine nozzle. For more engineering videos, tutorials, tips & tricks, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes VDEngineering
Views: 574 VDEngineering
MATLAB Numerical Methods: How to use the Runge Kutta 4th order method to solve a system of ODE's
 
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Hello! In this tutorial, I explain how to solve a system of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations using the RK4th order method in MATLAB. This tutorial covers: MATLAB functions RK4 formula Nonlinear damping integration Plotting multiple graphs on one window (subplot). I apologize for the slight blur in the MATLAB workspace, there was an issue with my screen recorder. However, the code can still be clearly seen. Have a great day!
Views: 9350 VDEngineering
PID Control: PD Controller Design Tutorial - With MATLAB & Simulink
 
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Dear Mechanical, Aerospace, Eng Phys, and Electrical/Computer Engineers! If you are a student in ME/AE/EP/EE or CE, there will be a time where you will take an introductory course in control systems. In this video I teach you how to design a PD controller for a missile silo by using MATLAB, hand formulas, and the Bode Plot Frequency Method. Specifically this video covers: Proportional, Integral, and Derivative Gain - what they do Transfer Functions Gain Margin / Phase Margin / Crossover Frequency / Time Response Settling Time / Rise Time / Percent Overshoot Bode Plots This video also covers implementing this basic control system using MATLAB and Simulink. In addition, Simulink 3D Animation is used in order to visualize this system with a CAD model developed in Solidworks. I hope you find this video helpful. I wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year (from Canada). Let us reach 2000 subscribers by the end of 2018! If you are curious as to how I implement Simulink 3D Animation, I highly recommend you all to watch my old video covering this topic in full detail here at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--9d8jYzLpg&t=435s and here at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPLl8kZgvsE For more engineering tutorials, tips and tricks, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 Best Wishes VDEngineering
Views: 760 VDEngineering
SpaceX Falcon Heavy Rocket Launch - SCIENTIFIC EXPLANATION!
 
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Consider joining my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/vdeng24 Hi Everyone! The Falcon Heavy Launch by SpaceX was quite a remarkable feat, once again proving the capabitilies for a heavy duty, reusable launch vehicle for rapid access to space. In this video, I provide a scientific breakdown of the launch for absolute beginners. Topics covered are as follows. 1) Falcon Heavy Facts 2) Launch / Liftoff 3) Engine Performance: Impulse / Burn Time / Staging 4) Merlin 1D Engine Gas Dynamics 5) Overexpanded and Underexpanded Nozzle Plumes 6) Stage 1 EDL (Entry Descent and Landing) Feel free to post your feedback and /or questions in the comments below. Have a good one:) For more videos like this, tutorials, tips & tricks, subscribe to this channel here at: https://www.youtube.com/user/vinayak678 SOURCES: http://www.larsblackmore.com/nae_bridge_2016.pdf https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/1.47202 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falcon_Heavy https://www.grc.nasa.gov/www/k-12/airplane/rockth.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta-v https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsiolkovsky_rocket_equation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_gas_thruster https://space.stackexchange.com/questions/7827/whats-the-typical-temperature-of-a-satellite-orbiting-the-earth http://www.spacex.com/sites/spacex/files/fheavy_product_page1.jpg ORIGINAL LAUNCH VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbSwFU6tY1c&t=862s BACKGROUND VIDEO (COPYRIGHT FREE): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bIjg8fExpU DISCLAIMER: The original launch video belongs to Space Exploration Technologies Corp. and no copyright infringement is intended. This video attempts to comply with YouTube's Fair Use Guidelines as closely as possible. Best Wishes VDEngineering
Views: 477 VDEngineering
ANSYS Fluent 3D CFD: Chevron Nozzle - Jet Engine (B787) Acoustics Tutorial!
 
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This video walks you through performing an acoustic simulation using the Broadband Noise Model for a Jet Engine. We will be using a Chevron Nozzle, commonly used on the Boeing 787 and new B737 aircraft. This video walks you through. 1) Creating the 3D Geometry in CAD 2) 3D Meshing 3) Running 3D CFD in Fluent 4) Acoustic Power Study For more videos, subscribe to this channel! Thanks for watching! About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students and young teens to pursue this as a career.
Views: 382 VDEngineering
High Speed Aerodynamics (Part 1): Lift and Drag on Supersonic Airfoil - SOLVED EXAMPLE!
 
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Aviation and Space Enthusiasts! Typical commercial aircraft have an airfoil which is subsonic, i.e. the flow is streamlined in order to obtain a higher pressure at the bottom and a lower pressure at the top. This is the fundamental cause of lift. However, for supersonic flight, the flow tends to 'compress' and 'expand' since the high Mach Number (airspeed relative to the speed of sound) tends to crush (or expand) the air flying in front of the aircraft. When a supersonic flow turns a concave corner, it creates an oblique shock. The airspeed is reduced, however there is an increase in pressure and temperature. When the flow turns a convex corner, the reverse occurs. A supersonic airfoil is designed in order to achieve a higher pressure at the bottom and a lower pressure at the top. This condition must be achieved regardless, to generate a positive upward force on the aircraft. However, supersonic airfoils take advantage of oblique shocks and expansion waves to achieve this effect. The bottom leading edge is designed to create an oblique shock which leads to an increase in pressure. I walk you through a full example of a supersonic airfoil. This may be helpful if you are a student in Aerospace or Mechanical Engineering. In order to follow along better, you will be better off going over 'Isentropic Flow Relation' formulas which can be available anywhere. These are standard formulas used for compressible flow calculations. Part 2 will focus on developing a CFD tutorial with ANSYS Fluent, to validate the results in Part 1 and to analyze the flow physics. ____________________ For more engineering tutorials, tips and tricks, subscribe! Best Wishes, VDEngineering
Views: 1968 VDEngineering
Introduction to 3D Animation using Simulink and V-Realm Builder - Part 2
 
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This is part 2 of my tutorial ! I cover 1) Introduction to Simulink 2) Connect VRML world to Simulink model 3) Configuring model for flight 4) Post processing results in MATLAB as an array
Views: 2851 VDEngineering
Simulink Aerospace Blockset Beginner Tutorial - Quadrotor 3D Dynamic Simulation (6-DOF)
 
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Hi Everyone, Welcome to my beginner Simulink tutorial on modeling and simulation of a quad-rotor helicopter. This is performed using the following tools. 1) Aerospace Blockset 2) Euler Angles 3) MATLAB embedded functions 4) Joystick Input 5) Rotation Matrices You can watch my mentioned videos here: Joystick Tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7KkciHn0jc&t=7s Joystick Control Tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ey2h97tt-fo&t=1s For more videos like this, make sure to subscribe! VD
Views: 652 VDEngineering
How to check for missing files on your PC Windows 7
 
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System File Checkey (SFC) tool
Views: 11582 VDEngineering
Introduction to PID Control with MATLAB and Simulink
 
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Hello! Here is my tutorial on joystick PID control. It is applied to a pitch axis model of a pivoted flight control surface (in this case, an elevator). This tutorial goes over: 1) Basic block diagram notation 2) Joystick input 3) PID control benefits 4) Implementation of closed loop control systems Joystick MATLAB Basics: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7KkciHn0jc Thank you all! Vin
Views: 830 VDEngineering
Get THIS Jump Rope If You Are Over 6 Feet Tall | 5Billion Jump Rope Review
 
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A different video from my typical engineering content. I have started jump roping in order to speed up my fat loss, and I review the jump rope I use today. Thanks for watching!
Views: 324 VDEngineering
Solidworks 2013: Absolute beginner tutorial (Simple Part)
 
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I am an engineering student and want to help the world design! This is my first video tutorial in Solidworks. Leave a like! and leave feedback in the comments below
Views: 1402 VDEngineering
Why do Airplane Wings Shake During Turbulence, Takeoff & Landing?
 
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Aviation Enthusiasts! Anyone who has sat near an airplane wing would have noticed that the wing tends to oscillate (rapidly move up and down) during turbulence, and even sometimes during takeoff and landing. This is a very common phenomena and is not as scary as you think. The phenomenon can lead to what is called Flutter (wing oscillates uncontrollably) and is due to the aero-elastic effects of the wing. What really causes this motion is the unsteady turbulent boundary layer caused my the motion of the air over the wing. During takeoff and landing, the aircraft is either speeding up or slowing down. This means that the fluid motion is changing. As a wing of an airplane is shaped like an airfoil, the accelerating or decelerating fluid changes the pressure distribution along the airfoil. This causes the boundary layer to become unsteady, thus leading to a varying pressure along the wing. This varying pressure will then lead to a varying force on the wing. As the wing behaves like a cantilever beam (one side of the beam is attached and the other is free), the wing then will vibrate up and down. The fact is that wings are designed to withstand significantly heavier loads than what you typically see even during severe turbulence. For more engineering and aircraft related videos, check out my channel! Best Wishes, VDEngineering MUSIC: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCht8qITGkBvXKsR1Byln-wA/videos
Views: 1060 VDEngineering
ANSYS Mechanical APDL: 2D Geometry and Meshing (ADD, SUBTRACT, BOOLEAN)
 
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This is a recording from a tutorial demonstration. I show you step by step how to use the Add, Subtract, and Boolean Operations in the ANSYS Mechanical APDL workspace to create an element. For more engineering videos, subscribe!
Views: 821 VDEngineering
MATLAB & Simulink Lecture: The Aerospace Blockset (Full Flight Simulation Example!)
 
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RESOURCES: Aerospace Blockset: https://www.mathworks.com/products/aeroblks.html Aerospace Blockset Lecture 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_dGm1mhHsM&t=10s HOW TO CONNECT SIMULINK TO FLIGHTGEAR: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jB-80cvV1Ao Hi Everyone! This video is a continuation of my first lecture delivered on the Aerospace Blockset which is a powerful tool embedded in MATLAB and Simulink. This lecture covers an example of a full landing flight simulation of the NASA HL-20 Personnel Launch System spaceplane. This video covers the following topics related to flight simulation and how they can be implemented into Simulink. 1) Aerodynamic Forces and Momentsa 2) Aircraft Subsystems (flaps, spoilers, landing gear) 3) Equations of Motion 4) Defining the Environment 5) Connecting MATLAB to FlightGear and running your simulation in real time. I hope this video helps those of you who are interested in using MATLAB and Simulink for academic or commercial use in your aerospace or mechanical engineering projects! Subscribe to this channel for more videos! Best Wishes, Vin VDEngineering About: My name is Vin and I am the creator of VDEngineering. I am 23 years old and I graduated with my Bachelor's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Canada. I now work in an aerospace firm supporting major programs for Bombardier. My hobbies include doing cool simulations, making engineering tutorial videos, video editing, photography, working out (calisthenics) and drone piloting. My goal of this channel is to spread my passion for Aerospace Engineering worldwide and to inspire more students to pursue this as a career.
Views: 157 VDEngineering
Solidworks Loft Basics - Design an Aircraft Nosecone (CAD Tutorial for Beginners! - B737 & F-22)
 
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If you're a Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering undergraduate student, you will inevitably have a project where you have to design a complex system in 3D CAD and then build it. This video walks you in DETAIL how to use the Loft feature within the Solidworks CAD tool (or any other CAD software such as CATIA, NX etc.) in order to design complex geometry. In this video we'll be designing the nosecone of the Boeing 737 and the F-22 Raptor. TIMESTAMPS: 0:00 INTRO 0:56 OVERVIEW 1:13 SETTING UP THE DESIGN (DRAWINGS) 1:48 B737 NOSECONE DESIGN 13:50 F-22 NOSECONE DESIGN Thanks for watching and make sure you share this video with your classmates!
Views: 274 VDEngineering
How a Quadrotor Works | The Fundamentals of Drone Flight (For Beginners)
 
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Hi everyone, In this video I walk you through how quad-rotors work and why they are so agile and simple to fly. I walk through the following: 1) Quadrotor Dynamics 2) Rotor Physics 3) Motion (Yaw, Pitch, Roll) 4) Ascent, Descent, Hover 5) Equations of Motion For more videos like this, subscribe to this channel at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRaiKJHsh_Ii4H-86uqXT_g?view_as=subscriber
Views: 116 VDEngineering
How do Aircraft and Spacecraft track their motion? The Direction Cosine Matrix Explained!
 
05:06
Hello! This is a crash course video on the basics of rigid body mechanics, Euler angles, as well as rotation. It covers: 1) 3-2-1 yaw/pitch/roll Euler angles 2) Direction Cosine Matrix (DCM) fundamentals 3) DCM example 4) DCM rules (Addition)
Views: 2038 VDEngineering

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