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Pneumonia: Types, Classification, Symptoms & Management – Respiratory Medicine | Lecturio
 
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This video “Pneumonia: Types, Classification, Symptoms & Management” is part of the Lecturio course “Respiratory Medicine” ► WATCH the complete course on http://lectur.io/pneumoniamanagement ► LEARN ABOUT: - Consolidation - Types - Clinical classification - Risk factors - Clinical symptoms - Clinical signs - Principles of management - Common blood test abnormalities - Differential diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia - Empirical antibiotics - Treatment ► THE PROF: Your lecturer is Professor Jeremy Brown, which is a clinician scientist with an interest in respiratory infection. He studied medicine in London, graduating with honors, and completed his PhD in molecular microbiology in 1999. Browns research is mainly focused on respiratory complications of haematological disease and stem cell transplantation. ► LECTURIO is your single-point resource for medical school: Study for your classes, USMLE Step 1, USMLE Step 2, MCAT or MBBS with video lectures by world-class professors, recall & USMLE-style questions and textbook articles. Create your free account now: http://lectur.io/pneumoniamanagement ► INSTALL our free Lecturio app iTunes Store: https://app.adjust.com/z21zrf Play Store: https://app.adjust.com/b01fak ► READ TEXTBOOK ARTICLES related to this video: Pneumonia — Classification, Diagnosis and Treatment http://lectur.io/pneumoniaarticle ► SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel: http://lectur.io/subscribe ► WATCH MORE ON YOUTUBE: http://lectur.io/playlists ► LET’S CONNECT: • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lecturio.medical.education.videos • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lecturio_medical_videos • Twitter: https://twitter.com/LecturioMed
IBD & Increased Risk of Pneumonia  - IBD in the News
 
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Edward Loftus Jr., M.D., a gastroenterologist at Mayo Clinic specializing in the care and evaluation of patients with IBD, discusses a recent study published in American Journal of Gastroenterology that found patients with inflammatory bowel disease were at an increased risk of pneumonia. In addition, Dr. Loftus also discusses the patient implications brought about by the study findings. For more information on IBD: Visit: http://www.mayoclinic.org/ibd To Learn more about the study: Visit: http://www.nature.com/ajg/journal/v108/n2/abs/ajg2012406a.html
Views: 404 Mayo Clinic
Shock Explained Clearly - Cardiogenic, Hypovolemic, and Septic
 
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Understand shock (cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and septic) with clear illustrations from Dr. Seheult of http://www.medcram.com. This is video 1 of 2 on shock (the types of shock and treatment). Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. MedCram: Medical topics explained clearly including: Asthma, COPD, Acute Renal Failure, Mechanical Ventilation, Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve, Hypertension, Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Medical Acid Base, VQ Mismatch, Hyponatremia, Liver Function Tests, Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs), Adrenal Gland, Pneumonia Treatment, any many others. New topics are often added weekly- please subscribe to help support MedCram and become notified when new videos have been uploaded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience: Health care professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram: Complete Video library: https://www.youtube.com/c/medcram Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your health care provider.
Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (Medical Condition)
 
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Symptoms, risk factors and treatments of Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (Medical Condition) Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia is a syndrome secondary to autoimmune and other lymphoproliferative disorders This video contains general medical information If in doubt, always seek professional medical advice. The medical information is not advice and should not be treated as such. The medical information is provided without any representations or warranties, express or implied. We do not warrant or represent that the medical information on this websiteis true, accurate, complete, current or non-misleading Music: 'Undaunted' Kevin Macleod CC-BY-3.0 Source/Images: "Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia" CC-BY-2.5 https://www.freebase.com/m/02wyy96
Hyperemesis Gravidarum - Cure Healing Rife Frequency | Binaural Beats Session
 
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Hyperemesis Gravidarum - Cure Healing Rife Frequency | Binaural Beats Session by HealingBox Brainwaves (Binaural Sound Therapy) Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a pregnancy complication that is characterized by severe nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and possibly dehydration. Signs and symptoms may also include vomiting many times a day and feeling faint. Hyperemesis gravidarum is considered more severe than morning sickness. Often symptoms get better after the 20th week of pregnancy but may last the entire pregnancy duration. The exact causes of hyperemesis gravidarum are unknown. Risk factors include the first pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, obesity, prior or family history of HG, trophoblastic disorder, and a history of eating disorders. Diagnosis is usually made based on the observed signs and symptoms. HG has been technically defined as more than three episodes of vomiting per day such that weight loss of 5% or three kilograms has occurred and ketones are present in the urine. Other potential causes of the symptoms should be excluded including urinary tract infection and high thyroid levels. Treatment includes drinking fluids and a bland diet. Recommendations may include electrolyte-replacement drinks, thiamine, and a higher protein diet. Some women require intravenous fluids. With respect to medications pyridoxine or metoclopramide are preferred. Prochlorperazine, dimenhydrinate, or ondansetron may be used if these are not effective. Hospitalization may be required. Psychotherapy may improve outcomes. Evidence for acupressure is poor. Please Subscribe us for Daily Updates and more Music... https://youtu.be/eaEM4MeDnSQ Find Us on social Media: https://twitter.com/HealingboxT https://plus.google.com/105980955065397573178 https://www.facebook.com/HealingBoxBrainwaves/
Ischemic stroke | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:06:54
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stroke 00:03:13 1 Classification 00:03:54 1.1 Definition 00:04:59 1.2 Ischemic 00:06:58 1.3 Hemorrhagic 00:08:32 2 Signs and symptoms 00:09:15 2.1 Early recognition 00:10:56 2.2 Subtypes 00:13:39 2.3 Associated symptoms 00:14:07 3 Causes 00:14:16 3.1 Thrombotic stroke 00:16:09 3.2 Embolic stroke 00:18:24 3.3 Cerebral hypoperfusion 00:19:25 3.4 Venous thrombosis 00:19:52 3.5 Intracerebral hemorrhage 00:20:51 3.6 Other 00:21:04 3.7 Silent stroke 00:22:14 4 Pathophysiology 00:22:23 4.1 Ischemic 00:26:34 4.2 Hemorrhagic 00:27:20 5 Diagnosis 00:28:03 5.1 Physical examination 00:28:27 5.2 Imaging 00:29:48 5.3 Underlying cause 00:31:44 5.4 Misdiagnosis 00:33:08 6 Prevention 00:34:05 6.1 Risk factors 00:35:49 6.1.1 Blood pressure 00:36:47 6.1.2 Blood lipids 00:37:16 6.1.3 Diabetes mellitus 00:37:43 6.1.4 Anticoagulation drugs 00:39:23 6.1.5 Surgery 00:41:01 6.1.6 Diet 00:41:23 6.2 Women 00:41:58 6.3 Previous stroke or TIA 00:43:15 7 Management 00:43:24 7.1 Ischemic stroke 00:44:27 7.1.1 Thrombolysis 00:46:35 7.1.2 Surgery 00:47:49 7.2 Hemorrhagic stroke 00:48:50 7.3 Stroke unit 00:49:22 7.4 Rehabilitation 00:55:56 7.5 Self-management 00:56:47 8 Prognosis 01:00:44 9 Epidemiology 01:03:09 10 History 01:05:12 11 Research 01:05:21 11.1 Angioplasty and stenting 01:05:39 11.2 Neuroprotection Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9273800195716434 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A stroke is a medical condition in which poor blood flow to the brain results in cell death. There are two main types of stroke: ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, and hemorrhagic, due to bleeding. They result in part of the brain not functioning properly. Signs and symptoms of a stroke may include an inability to move or feel on one side of the body, problems understanding or speaking, dizziness, or loss of vision to one side. Signs and symptoms often appear soon after the stroke has occurred. If symptoms last less than one or two hours it is known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or mini-stroke. A hemorrhagic stroke may also be associated with a severe headache. The symptoms of a stroke can be permanent. Long-term complications may include pneumonia or loss of bladder control.The main risk factor for stroke is high blood pressure. Other risk factors include tobacco smoking, obesity, high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, a previous TIA, and atrial fibrillation. An ischemic stroke is typically caused by blockage of a blood vessel, though there are also less common causes. A hemorrhagic stroke is caused by either bleeding directly into the brain or into the space between the brain's membranes. Bleeding may occur due to a ruptured brain aneurysm. Diagnosis is typically based on a physical exam and supported by medical imaging such as a CT scan or MRI scan. A CT scan can rule out bleeding, but may not necessarily rule out ischemia, which early on typically does not show up on a CT scan. Other tests such as an electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood tests are done to determine risk factors and rule out other possible causes. Low blood sugar may cause similar symptoms.Prevention includes decreasing risk factors, as well as possibly aspirin, statins, surgery to open up the arteries to the brain in those with problematic narrowing, and warfarin in those with atrial fibrillation. A stroke or TIA often requires emergency care. An ischemic stroke, if detected within three to four and half hours, may be treatable with a medication that can break down the clot. Aspirin should be used. Some hemorrhagic strokes benefit from surgery. Treatment to try to recover lost function is called stroke rehabilitation and ideally takes place in a stroke unit; however, these are not available in much of the world.In 2013 approximately 6.9 million people had an ischemic stroke and 3.4 million people had a hemorrhagic stroke. In 2015 th ...
Views: 56 wikipedia tts
Stroke | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:06:20
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Stroke 00:03:11 1 Classification 00:03:52 1.1 Definition 00:04:57 1.2 Ischemic 00:06:52 1.3 Hemorrhagic 00:08:26 2 Signs and symptoms 00:09:09 2.1 Early recognition 00:10:49 2.2 Subtypes 00:13:30 2.3 Associated symptoms 00:13:58 3 Causes 00:14:07 3.1 Thrombotic stroke 00:15:59 3.2 Embolic stroke 00:18:14 3.3 Cerebral hypoperfusion 00:19:14 3.4 Venous thrombosis 00:19:40 3.5 Intracerebral hemorrhage 00:20:40 3.6 Other 00:20:54 3.7 Silent stroke 00:22:02 4 Pathophysiology 00:22:12 4.1 Ischemic 00:26:22 4.2 Hemorrhagic 00:27:09 5 Diagnosis 00:27:51 5.1 Physical examination 00:28:15 5.2 Imaging 00:29:37 5.3 Underlying cause 00:31:32 5.4 Misdiagnosis 00:32:54 6 Prevention 00:33:51 6.1 Risk factors 00:35:34 6.1.1 Blood pressure 00:36:33 6.1.2 Blood lipids 00:37:01 6.1.3 Diabetes mellitus 00:37:28 6.1.4 Anticoagulation drugs 00:39:07 6.1.5 Surgery 00:40:41 6.1.6 Diet 00:41:03 6.2 Women 00:41:38 6.3 Previous stroke or TIA 00:42:53 7 Management 00:43:02 7.1 Ischemic stroke 00:44:05 7.1.1 Thrombolysis 00:46:12 7.1.2 Surgery 00:47:25 7.2 Hemorrhagic stroke 00:48:26 7.3 Stroke unit 00:48:56 7.4 Rehabilitation 00:55:28 7.5 Self-management 00:56:19 8 Prognosis 01:00:15 9 Epidemiology 01:02:38 10 History 01:04:39 11 Research 01:04:48 11.1 Angioplasty and stenting 01:05:06 11.2 Neuroprotection Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A stroke is a medical condition in which poor blood flow to the brain results in cell death. There are two main types of stroke: ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, and hemorrhagic, due to bleeding. They result in part of the brain not functioning properly. Signs and symptoms of a stroke may include an inability to move or feel on one side of the body, problems understanding or speaking, dizziness, or loss of vision to one side. Signs and symptoms often appear soon after the stroke has occurred. If symptoms last less than one or two hours it is known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or mini-stroke. A hemorrhagic stroke may also be associated with a severe headache. The symptoms of a stroke can be permanent. Long-term complications may include pneumonia or loss of bladder control.The main risk factor for stroke is high blood pressure. Other risk factors include tobacco smoking, obesity, high blood cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, a previous TIA, and atrial fibrillation. An ischemic stroke is typically caused by blockage of a blood vessel, though there are also less common causes. A hemorrhagic stroke is caused by either bleeding directly into the brain or into the space between the brain's membranes. Bleeding may occur due to a ruptured brain aneurysm. Diagnosis is typically based on a physical exam and supported by medical imaging such as a CT scan or MRI scan. A CT scan can rule out bleeding, but may not necessarily rule out ischemia, which early on typically does not show up on a CT scan. Other tests such as an electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood tests are done to determine risk factors and rule out other possible causes. Low blood sugar may cause similar symptoms.Prevention includes decreasing risk factors, as well as possibly aspirin, statins, surgery to open up the arteries to the brain in those with problematic narrowing, and warfarin in those with atrial fibrillation. A stroke or TIA often requires emergency care. An ischemic stroke, if detected within three to four and half hours, may be treatable with a medication that can break down the clot. Aspirin should be used. Some hemorrhagic strokes benefit from surgery. Treatment to try to recover lost function is called stroke rehabilitation and ideally takes place in a stroke unit; however, these are not available in much of the world.In 2013 approximately 6.9 million people had an ischemic stroke and 3.4 million people had a hemorrhagic stroke. In 2015 there were about 42.4 million people who had previously had a stroke and were still alive. Between 1990 and 2010 the number of strokes which occurred each year decreased by approximately 10% ...
Views: 39 wikipedia tts