Home
Search results “Leaf mining lepidoptera larvae”
leaf miner Is a Larva of Insects No disease
 
00:43
A leaf miner is the larva of an insect that lives in and eats the leaf tissue of plants. The vast majority of leaf-mining insects are moths (Lepidoptera), sawflies (Symphyta, a type of wasp) and flies (Diptera), though some beetles also exhibit this behavior. Leaf miners are regarded as pests by many farmers and gardeners as they can cause damage to agricultural crops and garden plants, and can be difficult to control with insecticide sprays as they are protected inside the plant's leaves. Spraying the infected plants with Spinosad, an organic insecticide, will control the leaf miner. Spinosad does not kill on contact but must be ingested by the leaf miner. Two or three applications may be needed in a season, being careful not to spray when bees are around. Leaf miner infection can be reduced or prevented by planting trap crops near the plants to be protected. For example, lambsquarter, columbine, and velvetleaf[disambiguation needed] will distract leaf miners, drawing them to those plants and therefore reducing the incidence of attack on nearby crops. This is a method of companion planting. ...got sources from goggle https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaf_miner
Views: 35 laxmi
Leafminer caterpillar
 
00:31
Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae
Views: 1175 Andrey Mishchenko
What are Leafminers - How to kill/counter Leaf Miners (URDU/HINDI)
 
06:27
What are Leaf Miners - How to kill/control Leaf Miners. A leaf miner is the larva of an insect that lives in and eats the leaf tissue of plants. The vast majority of leaf-mining insects are moths, sawflies and flies, though some beetles also exhibit this behavior. The spinach leafminer feeds on spinach, Swiss chard, tomato, cucumber, and celery. The vegetable leafminer feeds on bean, eggplant, pepper, potato, squash, tomato, and watermelon, cucumber, beet, pea, lettuce and many other plants. As the larvae feed and develop, they create “mines” of dead tissue where they have fed. Keep your soil alive by using compost and other soil amendments. Use floating row covers (Harvest-Guard) to prevent fly stage from laying eggs on leaves. The parasitic wasp Diglyphus isaea is a commercially available beneficial insect that will kill leafminer larva in the mine. Neem oil has a dual purpose in the vegetable garden as both a pesticide and a fungicide. It works on arthropod pests that often eat your vegetables, including tomato hornworms, corn earworm, aphids and whiteflies. Please join my Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/PakistanHydroponics/ VISIT MY WEBSITE: www.pakistanhydroponics.com
Views: 15138 Pakistan Hydroponics
Lapidoptera Larval Physiological damage to citrus leaves and plants
 
02:25
Physiological Effects of Citrus Leaf-miner Phyllonistis Citrella (Lepidoptera :(Gracillariidae) Larval Feeding on Photosynthetic and Gaseous Exchange rate in Citrus Lead Author: Mohammad Arshad Abstract link:https://academic.oup.com/jee/article-abstract/111/5/2264/5033866?redirectedFrom=fulltext
Views: 7 Research Watch
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly ... Larva
 
03:01
This video by Ryan Perry, a student at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, spoofs the Clint Eastwood movie using Citrus Leaf Miner and one of its parasitoids.
Lemon leaf miner & butter fly control.Pakistan Dr. Ashraf Sahibzada
 
00:40
Dr. Ashraf Sahibzada renowned scientist produced this program for farmers, students and extension workers. Currently his NDF Helpline # is 080070714 and Dr. Sahibzada's Cell # 03335121879.
Views: 808 Ashraf Sahibzada
Pupa of Phyllonorycter sorbi
 
01:01
Leaf-miner moth: Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae (on Sorbus aucuparia - Rowan-tree)
Views: 78 Andrey Mishchenko
Virginia Creeper Leafminer Moth Caterpillar - Antispila ampelopsifoliella - HD Macro
 
09:04
The larvae inside these leaves (viewed from underneath) are Virginia creeper leafminer moth caterpillars (Antispila ampelopsifoliella). The caterpillar’s head, legs, and organs are visible. I record and edit all of my videos using an iPhone 7, generally with a 10x macro lens/case from amazon. For more videos like this, follow me on IG at @garbage.nobility and/or check my personal arthropod related tag #garbagearthropodsetc to see all of my arthropod related posts in one place.
Views: 11 Lisa Marie Carrick
Leucoptera erythrinella cocoon spinning Time Lapse II
 
00:42
This video depicts 4 hours in the life of two caterpillars of the Erythrina Leafminer, Leucoptera erythrinella. As one can see, spinning cocoons takes a lot of energy and time. Based on biomimetic investigation of this behavior at the Institute for Computational Design and Construction (ICD), ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion was built in 2016-17: http://icd.uni-stuttgart.de/?p=18905 More about this moth can be found here: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/o... This video is a prequel to the one at: https://youtu.be/T5YS9rlSpnQ Credits: Andrei Sourakov & James Schlachta, Florida Museum of Natural History
Leaf blotch miner moth (Phyllonorycter sorbi)
 
00:21
Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae
Views: 110 Andrey Mishchenko
Macro Photography Sawfly Larvae
 
09:08
Made a set up to photograph a Sawfly Larvae.
Views: 23 Paul Ruddock Macro
The larva of the parasite on host pupa
 
00:46
The first instar larva - Minotetrastichus frontalis (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae). The pupa - Phyllonorycter issikii (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae)
Views: 438 Andrey Mishchenko
Tuta absoluta [Tomato Leafminer Moth] #PestPrimer
 
09:08
--Literature Reference: Arnó, J., & Gabarra, R. (2011). Side effects of selected insecticides on the Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) predators Macrolophus pygmaeus and Nesidiocoris tenuis (Hemiptera: Miridae). Journal of Pest Science, 84(4), 513–520. doi:10.1007/s10340-011-0384-z Desneux, N., Luna, M. G., Guillemaud, T., & Urbaneja, A. (2011). The invasive South American tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta, continues to spread in Afro-Eurasia and beyond: the new threat to tomato world production. Journal of Pest Science, 84(4), 403–408. doi:10.1007/s10340-011-0398-6 Biondi, A., Guedes, R. N. C., Wan, F.-H., & Desneux, N. (2018). Ecology, Worldwide Spread, and Management of the Invasive South American Tomato Pinworm, Tuta absoluta: Past, Present, and Future. Annual Review of Entomology, 63(1), 239–258. doi:10.1146/annurev-ento-031616-034933 Đurić, Z., Delić, D., Hrnčić, S., & Radonjić, S. (2014). Distribution and molecular identification of Tuta absoluta (Meyrick, 1917) (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae) populations in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro. Polish Journal of Entomology, 83(2), 121–129. doi:10.2478/pjen-2014-0009 Guimapi, R. Y. A., Mohamed, S. A., Okeyo, G. O., Ndjomatchoua, F. T., Ekesi, S., & Tonnang, H. E. Z. (2016). Modeling the risk of invasion and spread of Tuta absoluta in Africa. Ecological Complexity, 28, 77–93. doi:10.1016/j.ecocom.2016.08.001 Kılıç, T. (2010). First record of Tuta absoluta in Turkey. Phytoparasitica, 38(3), 243–244. doi:10.1007/s12600-010-0095-7 Urbaneja, A., Montón, H., & Mollá, O. (2009). Suitability of the tomato borerTuta absolutaas prey forMacrolophus pygmaeusandNesidiocoris tenuis. Journal of Applied Entomology, 133(4), 292–296. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0418.2008.01319.x Ghaderi, S., Fathipour, Y., & Asgari, S. (2017). Susceptibility of Seven Selected Tomato Cultivars to Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae): Implications for Its Management. Journal of Economic Entomology, 110(2), 421–429. doi:10.1093/jee/tow275 Urbaneja, A., González-Cabrera, J., Arnó, J., & Gabarra, R. (2012). Prospects for the biological control of Tuta absoluta in tomatoes of the Mediterranean basin. Pest Management Science, 68(9), 1215–1222. doi:10.1002/ps.3344 Mollá, O., González-Cabrera, J., & Urbaneja, A. (2011). The combined use of Bacillus thuringiensis and Nesidiocoris tenuis against the tomato borer Tuta absoluta. BioControl, 56(6), 883–891. doi:10.1007/s10526-011-9353-y Seplyarsky, V., Weiss, M., & Haberman, A. (2010). Tuta absoluta Povolny (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), a new invasive species in Israel. Phytoparasitica, 38(5), 445–446. doi:10.1007/s12600-010-0115-7 Ferracini, C., Ingegno, B. L., Navone, P., Ferrari, E., Mosti, M., Tavella, L., & Alma, A. (2012). Adaptation of Indigenous Larval Parasitoids to Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in Italy. Journal of Economic Entomology, 105(4), 1311–1319. doi:10.1603/ec11394 Silva, G. A., Picanço, M. C., Bacci, L., Crespo, A. L. B., Rosado, J. F., & Guedes, R. N. C. (2011). Control failure likelihood and spatial dependence of insecticide resistance in the tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta. Pest Management Science, 67(8), 913–920. doi:10.1002/ps.2131 Siqueira, H. A. A., Guedes, R. N. C., & Picanco, M. C. (2000). Cartap resistance and synergism in populations of Tuta absoluta (Lep., Gelechiidae). Journal of Applied Entomology, 124(5-6), 233–238. doi:10.1046/j.1439-0418.2000.00470.x Škaljac, M., Kostanjšek, R., & Žanić, K. (2012). The Presence ofWolbachiainTuta absoluta(Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) Populations from Coastal Croatia and Montenegro. African Entomology, 20(1), 191–194. doi:10.4001/003.020.0125 Reyes, M., Rocha, K., Alarcón, L., Siegwart, M., & Sauphanor, B. (2012). Metabolic mechanisms involved in the resistance of field populations of Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) to spinosad. Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology, 102(1), 45–50. doi:10.1016/j.pestbp.2011.10.008 Guedes, R. N. C., & Picanço, M. C. (2012). The tomato borerTuta absolutain South America: pest status, management and insecticide resistance. EPPO Bulletin, 42(2), 211–216. doi:10.1111/epp.2557 and others!
Views: 69 Zenthanol
Rolling a leaf
 
00:40
A larva of Caloptilia theivora (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) is rolling a leaf of the tea plant Camellia theivora
Views: 107 Issei Ohshima
Leafminer caterpillar
 
00:31
Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae
Views: 185 Andrey Mishchenko
Coleophora siccifolia
 
00:45
Coleophora is a huge genus of moths with an estimated number of 4000 species which makes it to one of the largest lepidopteran groups. The genus name hints at the larval behavior of building a case in which the caterpillar lives throughout its development. Many species are leafminers and cut out parts of the mines they produced and construct their cases with this material. When feeding their head and thorax are inserted in the leaf while the rest The video shows the not too common Coleophora siccifolia. Its caterpillar makes a particularly well camouflaged case that very well resembles a dry piece of leaf that nonchalantly dangles on fresh foliage. During its development the caterpillar builds several elaborate cases whose construction is described as follows in Emmet et al. (1996): "Activity starts again in the spring, with the larva making large, brownish blotch-mines, generally several to a leaf. [...] The larva certainly makes two new cases in the spring, possibly three [...]. These cases [...] are constructed like the first, but in larger leaves. The larva again makes a silken tube and then excises a large section of the leaf in such a way that the tube lies well to one side; the old case is left attached to the edge of the excision. The flap of leaf on the new case soon withers, turns brown and curls itself over the tube."
Views: 47 Franziska Bauer
Repairing home (inside the leaf mine)
 
01:09
The caterpillar of Phyllonorycter ulmifoliella (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae) - leaf blotch miner (on Betula pendula - birch)
Views: 157 Andrey Mishchenko
Larva of Theretra alecto fed on grape leaves & its petiole
 
02:39
Larva of Theretra alecto (Sphingidae: Lepidoptera) that fed on grape leaves and its petiole. Location: Kurdistan / Akre Date: 1/9/2016
Views: 139 Hani Akreyi
Mango insect pests# Mango leaf miner, Acrocercops syngramma
 
00:26
Mango leaf miner, Acrocercops syngramma Insecta: Lepidoptera: Gracillarioidea: Gracillariidae: Gracillariinae Larvae mine tender leaves, producing blister marks and pupate inside the mines. Adult moth is very small, with characteristic silvery bands on fore wings. Commonly found, often serious.
Views: 4 Dr Santosh Kedar
Amazing Looking Red Head Caterpillar Moth
 
00:43
The life cycle or life history of Butterflies and Moths is:- The Egg or Ovum, The Caterpillar or Larva, The Chrysalis or Pupa and finally the Adult Butterfly or Moth (the Imago). BUTTERFLY AND MOTH EGGS Eggs come in an incredible variety of shapes, sizes and markings. Those that are going to hatch out within a week or two are often laid on a leaf, some on the upper side of the leaf and some on the underside and they may be laid singly, in pairs or in a large batch depending on the species. A few species drop their eggs into grasses when in flight. Many species that overwinter as eggs lay them on the trunk, branch or twig of a tree and often close to a bud. THE CATERPILLAR OR LARVA Most caterpillars have 3 pairs of true legs and with a few exceptions up to 5 pairs of prolegs or claspers as illustrated in the picture below. The true legs are segmented with joints and become the walking legs in the adult butterfly or moth. In most cases the number of prolegs varies from 2 to 5 but some leaf-mining caterpillars and Limacodidae species have none and some Zygaenoidea have more than 5 pairs. The number of prolegs and their size is often helpful in determining which family or families the caterpillar is likely to be part of and hence can help in identifying which species it is, examples from a few families can be found below. As a caterpillar grows in size it becomes too large for its skin which it sheds, typically 4 times, before it changes into a chrysalis. In some cases the number of prolegs which are visible increases as the caterpillar grows and changes its skin. WHAT'S THAT CATERPILLAR? MOTH CATERPILLARS Trying to work out the species of many caterpillars is often very difficult, not only because of the large number of species but also because many caterpillars undergo a significant change in their appearance as they grow. One method that can be used to start the identification process is to try and work out which family grouping the caterpillar belongs to. The following gives some pointers to help decide which of the main family groups a caterpillar belongs to. The order in which the families are listed below is not taxonomic but is my own suggestion for working through some of the key identifying characteristics. This starts with caterpillars that only have two pairs of functional prolegs, then three pairs followed by the groups which, apart from a small number of exceptions, have five pairs of prolegs.
Views: 484 Insects Sniper
Caterpillar of Stigmella sp.
 
00:51
Leaf-miner moth: Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae (on Pyrus communis - Pear)
Views: 46 Andrey Mishchenko
The parasite is eating the caterpillar of Phyllonorycter
 
00:51
The caterpillar - Leaf blotch miner moth (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae). The parasite - larva of the chalcid wasp (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea)
Views: 445 Andrey Mishchenko
The larva of the parasite wasp Minotetrastichus frontalis
 
00:26
The last instar larva of the chalcid wasp (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae) on the host pupa Phyllonorycter issikii (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae)
Views: 436 Andrey Mishchenko
Laxation of the larva of the chalcid wasp (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae)
 
00:32
Near the caterpillar host (Phyllonorycter issikii, Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae)
Views: 110 Andrey Mishchenko
Seri Vlog - Black Swallowtail Caterpillar!
 
04:13
One summer afternoon, while helping to gather flowers up for a wedding, Seri stumbled across a stunning caterpillar munching away at the bridal bouquet! After helping him escape from an irate bride we learned that this caterpillar is the fourth instar stage of the Black Swallowtail Butterfly! _______________________________________________ • Seri is a biologist-in-training with an intense passion for plants and filling her house to the brim with finches, potted plants, and biology "specimens" that look oddly like snail shells, mossy, and twigs covering every available surface. She is also big into spreading her love of the natural world through the entertaining medium of story-telling through video games! Jump on in and see what our amazing, animal-loving, plant-studying community is all about! And remember, stay curious! • _______________________________________________ • Seri! Let's Play! Official Website: http://www.mossleaf.net • By the Leaf! Etsy Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ByTheLeaf • Facebook: http://ow.ly/BB6nh • Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/Seriiiously • Instagram: http://instagram.com/seriiiously • Twitter: https://twitter.com/Seriiiously
Petrea volubilis and Helichrysum grows in India
 
02:22
Native to Central America, Purple Wreath is a very lovely small climber with drooping long racemes of delicate violet-purple star-like flowers. It is a semi-shrub and semi-climber and the small wooden trunk develops artistic curves over the years. It looks as if an Ikebana expert has shaped it for his floral arrangement. It grows best in sunshine. It flowers in spring and in some areas also in November. The flowers come in raceme reaching over 1 foot long. The true flower, which is purple, lasts a couple of days but the blue bracts remain much longer, slowly turning gray. The genus Helichrysum consists of an estimated 600 species, in the sunflower family (Asteraceae). The type species is Helichrysum orientale. The name is derived from the Greek words ἑλίσσω (helisso, to turn around) and χρῡσός (chrysos, gold). It occurs in Africa (with 244 species in South Africa), Madagascar, Australasia and Eurasia. The plants may be annuals, herbaceous perennials or shrubs, growing to a height of 60–90 cm (24–35 inches). The genus was a wastebasket taxon, and many of its members have been reclassified in smaller genera, most notably the Everlastings, now in the genus Xerochrysum. Their leaves are oblong to lanceolate. They are flat and pubescent on both sides. The bristles of the pappus are scabrous, barbellate, or plumose. The receptacle (base of the flower head) is often smooth, with a fringed margin, or honey-combed, and resemble daisies. They may be in almost all colors, except blue. There are many capitula and generally flat-topped corymbs or panicles. The corolla lobes show glandular hairs at the abaxial surface. Several species are grown as ornamental plants, and for dried flowers. When cut young and dried, the open flowers and stalks preserve their colour and shape for long periods. Helichrysum species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the bucculaticid leaf-miners Bucculatrix gnaphaliella (which feeds exclusively on Helichrysum arenarium) and Bucculatrix helichrysella (feeds exclusively on H. italicum) and the Coleophora case-bearers C. caelebipennella, C. gnaphalii (feeds exclusively on H arenarium) and C. helichrysiella (feeds exclusively on H. italicum). Helichrysum italicum (synonym Helichrysum angustifolium) is steam distilled to produce a yellow-reddish essential oil popular in fragrance for its unique scent, best described as a mixture of burnt sugar and ham. Angustifolium means narrow leaved. The name is commonly misspelled as "augustifolium". Source: Wikipedia This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The Wilderness Films India collection comprises of 50, 000+ hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM / SR 1080i High Definition, Alexa, SR, XDCAM and 4K. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Please subscribe to our channel wildfilmsindia on Youtube for a steady stream of videos from across India. Also, visit and enjoy your journey across India at www.clipahoy.com , India's first video-based social networking experience! Reach us at [email protected] and [email protected]
Views: 8338 WildFilmsIndia
The parasitic larva eating the caterpillar of the host
 
00:51
The caterpillar - Phyllonorycter issikii (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae). The larva - Minotetrastichus frontalis (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae)
Views: 998 Andrey Mishchenko
The larva of the parasitic wasp on host caterpillar
 
00:31
The caterpillar - Phyllonorycter issikii (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae). The larva - Minotetrastichus frontalis (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae)
Views: 566 Andrey Mishchenko
Spodoptera exigua: Beet armyworm
 
05:21
"Spodoptera exigua", commonly known as rosquilla verde in Spain or gusano soldado in Latin America, and beet armyworm in the USA and other English speaking countries; is a Lepidoptera which belongs to the super family of the Noctuidae. This is a migratory plague of a polyphagous nature which causes it to affect horticultural produce such as peppers, tomatoes, aubergines, cucumbers, beans, water melons and other plants. The female worm is extremely fertile throughout seasons of warm temperatures and as a result is able to lay up to 1,700 eggs; the level of fertility decreasing in the cold season to around 500 eggs. The eggs are laid mainly on the underneath part of the leaves. Once emergence occurs, the larvae immediately begin to eat the newly formed leaves and flowers, moving together in first phase clusters. However, throughout their development, they separate themselves and continue to devour both leaves and fruit. At the end of the larvae cycle, the larvae drop down or allow themselves to fall onto the ground in order to pupate; burying themselves in the shallow ground and forming a silky cocoon. The length of the chrysalis stage depends on the temperature, and from this point onwards the new adults emerge and a new cycle or generation begins. The length of the complete cycle will vary according to atmospheric conditions. However, the average cycle will be between thirty to forty days. The damage produced due to feeding can be recognised as holes chewed in leaves, flowers and also fruit. Damage to leaves can be observed as perforations, which are almost circular in shape. These are found in the blade or edge of the leaf and tend to be located in the area of the leaf veins. The small caterpillars only eat the parenchyma of the leaf, leaving behind the epidermis. However, the larger caterpillars cause a decrease in the size of the surface area of the leaf, which in turn will affect the vegetative growth of the plant. Fruit damage is extremely significant with regard to peppers and water melons crops. Perforations are produced in the peppers from the point at which the caterpillars make their entrance. They feed inside the pepper which causes rotting, and with regard to water melons the caterpillars cause superficial gnawing to the peel of the fruit. As a preventative measure it is important to take care in the first phenological stages of plant growth, especially by carefully eliminating the remains of prior crops and weeds. It is also important to place nets over the strips of ground used in order to prevent the possible entrance of butterflies. The use of light traps and pheromones can also help to control the adults. With respect to chemical control, the use of applications which reach the underneath parts of the leaves is highly recommended. These should be made with active materials such as indoxacarb, lufenuron and spinosad. Biological control can be undertaken with applications of "Bacillus thuringiensis" and with the use of nuclear polyhedrosis virus for the control of "Spodoptera exigua" during the egg laying stage or the first larvae stage. This treatment should be repeated every seven days taking into account any natural enemies and the effects caused by general predators.
Views: 14120 infoagrocom
Caterpillar of Stigmella sorbi
 
00:31
Leaf-miner moth: Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae (on Sorbus aucuparia - Rowan-tree)
Views: 53 Andrey Mishchenko
Sawfly Larva (Tenthedinidae: Periclista) on Oak Leaf
 
00:22
Photographed at the Turtle River State Park, North Dakota (29 May 2012).
Views: 53 Carl Barrentine
Helichrysum  or Strawflowers growing in a garden
 
00:53
Helichrysum or Strawflower growing in New Delhi. Red Everlasting (Helichrysum sanguineum) Kingdom: Plantae Order: Asterales Family: Asteraceae Subfamily: Asteroideae Tribe: Gnaphalieae Genus: Helichrysum Helichrysum arenarium - Dwarf Everlasting Helichrysum italicum - Curry Plant Helichrysum petiolare - Licorice Plant Helichrysum sanguineum - Red Everlasting Helichrysum (H. italicum) essential oil in clear glass vial The genus Helichrysum /hɛlɨˈkraɪsəm/ consists of an estimated 600 species, in the sunflower family (Asteraceae). The type species is Helichrysum orientale. The name is derived from the Greek words helisso (to turn around) and chrysos (gold). It occurs in Africa (with 244 species in South Africa), Madagascar, Australasia and Eurasia. The plants may be annuals, herbaceous perennials or shrubs, growing to a height of 60--90 cm. The genus was a wastebasket taxon, and many of its members have been reclassified in smaller genera, most notably the Everlastings, now in the genus Xerochrysum. Their leaves are oblong to lanceolate. They are flat and pubescent on both sides. The bristles of the pappus are scabrous, barbellate, or plumose. The receptacle (base of the flower head) is often smooth, with a fringed margin, or honey-combed, and resemble daisies. They may be in almost all colors, except blue. There are many capitula and generally flat-topped corymbs or panicles. The corolla lobes show glandular hairs at the abaxial surface. Several species are grown as ornamental plants, and for dried flowers. When cut young and dried, the open flowers and stalks preserve their colour and shape for long periods. Helichrysum species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the bucculaticid leaf-miners Bucculatrix gnaphaliella (which feeds exclusively on Helichrysum arenarium) and Bucculatrix helichrysella (feeds exclusively on H. italicum) and the Coleophora case-bearers C. caelebipennella, C. gnaphalii (feeds exclusively on H arenarium) and C. helichrysiella (feeds exclusively on H. italicum). Helichrysum italicum (synonym Helichrysum angustifolium) is steam distilled to produce a yellow-reddish essential oil popular in fragrance for its unique scent, best described as a mixture of burnt sugar and ham. Angustifolium means narrow leaved. The name is commonly misspelled as "augustifolium". Source - Wikipedia This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The Wilderness Films India collection comprises of tens of thousands of hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM 1080i High Definition, HDV and XDCAM. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Reach us at wfi @ vsnl.com and [email protected]
Views: 6413 WildFilmsIndia
Fallen waxy flowers of Sehmal Silk Cotton tree in Indian spring
 
03:01
Silk cotton tree is a type of native cotton tree with large red flowers. The genus name Salmalia is derived from the sanskrit name shaalmali. Silk cotton trees comprise eight species in the genus Bombax, native to India, tropical southern Asia, northern Australia and tropical Africa. Semul trees bear beautiful red-colored flowers during January to March. The phenomenon paints the whole landscape in an enchanting red hue. The fruit, the size of a ping-pong ball, on maturity appears during March and April. These are full of cotton-like fibrous stuff. It is for the fiber that villagers gather the semul fruit and extract the cotton substance called "kopak". This substance is used for filling economically priced pillows, quilts, sofas etc. The fruit is cooked and eaten and also pickled. Semul is quite a fast growing tree and can attain a girth of 2 to 3 m, and height about 30 m, in nearly 50 years or so. Its wood, when sawn fresh, is white in color. However, with exposure and passage of time it grows darkish gray. It is as light as 10 to 12 kg, per cubic foot. It is easy to work but not durable anywhere other than under water. So it is popular for construction work, but is very good and prized for manufacture of plywood, match boxes and sticks, scabbards, patterns, moulds, etc. Also for making canoes and light duty boats and or other structures required under water. Bombax species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the leaf-miner Bucculatrix crateracma which feeds exclusively on Bombax ceiba. This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The collection comprises of 150, 000+ hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM / SR 1080i High Definition, Alexa, SR, XDCAM and 4K. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Please subscribe to our channel wildfilmsindia on Youtube for a steady stream of videos from across India. Also, visit and enjoy your journey across India at www.clipahoy.com , India's first video-based social networking experience! Reach us at rupindang [at] gmail [dot] com and [email protected] To SUBSCRIBE click the below link: www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=WildFilmsIndia Like & Follow Us on: Facebook: www.facebook.com/WildernessFilmsIndiaLimited Website: www.wildfilmsindia.com
Views: 3091 WildFilmsIndia
Brazil CATERPILLAR killer kills in 15 hours (subtitled Portuguese)-TATURANA-venenosa e mortal
 
03:56
Brazil taturana assassina mata em 15 horas (legendado português) Brasil/portugal pt br. **** Caterpillar Caterpillars are the larval form of members of the order Lepidoptera (the insect order comprising butterflies and moths). They are mostly herbivorous in food habit, although some species are insectivorous. Caterpillars are voracious feeders and many of them are considered to be pests in agriculture. Many moth species are better known in their caterpillar stages because of the damage they cause to fruits and other agricultural produce. The geometrids, also known as inchworms or loopers, are so named because of the way they move, appearing to measure the earth (the word geometrid means earth-measurer in Greek); the primary reason for this unusual locomotion is the elimination of nearly all the prolegs except the clasper on the terminal segment. Caterpillars have soft bodies that can grow rapidly between moults. Only the head capsule is hardened. The mandibles are tough and sharp for chewing leaves (this contrasts with most adult Lepidoptera, which have highly reduced or soft mandibles). Behind the mandibles of the caterpillar are the spinnerets, for manipulating silk. Some larvae of the Hymenoptera order (ants, bees and wasps) can appear like the caterpillars of the lepidoptera. Such larvae are mainly seen in the sawfly family. However while these larvae superficially resemble caterpillars, they can be distinguished by the presence of prolegs on every abdominal segment, an absence of crochets or hooks on the prolegs (these are present on lepidopteran caterpillars), prominent ocelli on the head capsule, and an absence of the upside-down Y-shaped suture on the front of the head Many animals feed on caterpillars as they are rich in protein. As a result caterpillars have evolved various means of defense. The appearance of a caterpillar can often repel a predator: its markings and certain body parts can make it seem poisonous, or bigger in size and thus threatening, or non-edible. Some types of caterpillars are indeed poisonous, and are capable of shooting acid. Some caterpillars have long "whip-like" organs attached to the ends of their body. The caterpillar wiggles these organs to frighten away flies Caterpillars have evolved defenses against physical conditions such as cold, hot or dry environmental conditions. Some Arctic species like Gynaephora groenlandica have special basking and aggregation behaviours apart from physiological adaptations to remain in a dormant state Many caterpillars are cryptically coloured and resemble the plants on which they feed and may even have parts that mimic plant parts such as thorns. Their size varies from as little as 1 mm to about 75 millimetres (3.0 in). Some look like objects in the environment such as bird droppings. Many feed enclosed inside silk galleries, rolled leaves or by mining between the leaf surfaces. Caterpillars of Nemoria arizonaria that grow in spring feed on oak catkins and appear green. The summer brood appear like oak twigs. The differential development is linked to the tannin content in the diet.[7] More aggressive self-defense measures are taken by some caterpillars. These measures include having spiny bristles or long fine hair-like setae with detachable tips that will irritate by lodging in the skin or mucous membranes However some birds (such as cuckoos) will swallow even the hairiest of caterpillars. The most aggressive caterpillar defenses are bristles associated with venom glands. These bristles are called urticating hairs. A venom which is among the most potent defensive chemicals in any animal is produced by the South American silk moth genus Lonomia. Its venom is an anticoagulant powerful enough to cause a human to hemorrhage to death (See Lonomiasis).This chemical is being investigated for potential medical applications. Most urticating hairs range in effect from mild irritation to dermatitis. Plants contain toxins which protect them from herbivores, but some caterpillars have evolved countermeasures which enable them to eat the leaves of such toxic plants. In addition to being unaffected by the poison, the caterpillars sequester it in their body, making them highly toxic to predators. The chemicals are also carried on into the adult stages. These toxic species, such as the Cinnabar moth (Tyria jacobaeae) and monarch (Danaus plexippus) caterpillars, usually advertise themselves with the danger colors of red, yellow and black, often in bright stripes (see aposematism). Any predator that attempts to eat a caterpillar with an aggressive defense mechanism will learn and avoid future attempts. Some caterpillars regurgitate acidic digestive juices at attacking enemies. Many papilionid larvae produce bad smells from extrudable glands called osmeteria. .
Views: 34056 aurevlis
Narrow-bordered Five-spot Burnet caterpiller
 
01:51
Scientifically named Zygaena lonicerae caterpillar spotted eating flowers causing damage to flower. Caterpillars are the larval form of members of the order Lepidoptera (the insect order comprising butterflies and moths). They are mostly herbivorous in food habit, although some species are insectivorous. Caterpillars are voracious feeders and many of them are considered to be pests in agriculture. Many moth species are better known in their caterpillar stages because of the damage they cause to fruits and other agricultural produce. The etymological origins of the word are from the early 16th century, from Middle English catirpel, catirpeller, probably an alteration of Old North French catepelose: cate, cat (from Latin cattus) + pelose, hairy (from Latin pilōsus) Many animals feed on caterpillars as they are rich in protein. As a result caterpillars have evolved various means of defense. The appearance of a caterpillar can often repel a predator: its markings and certain body parts can make it seem poisonous, or bigger in size and thus threatening, or non-edible. Some types of caterpillars are indeed poisonous. Caterpillars have evolved defenses against physical conditions such as cold, hot or dry environmental conditions. Some Arctic species like Gynaephora groenlandica have special basking and aggregation behaviours apart from physiological adaptations to remain in a dormant state. Many caterpillars are cryptically colored and resemble the plants on which they feed. They may even have parts that mimic plant parts such as thorns. Their size varies from as little as 1 mm to about 75 millimetres (3.0 in). Some look like objects in the environment such as bird droppings. Many feed enclosed inside silk galleries, rolled leaves or by mining between the leaf surfaces. Caterpillars of Nemoria arizonaria that grow in spring feed on oak catkins and appear green. The summer brood appear like oak twigs. The differential development is linked to the tannin content in the diet. source - Wikipedia This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The Wilderness Films India collection comprises of tens of thousands of hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM 1080i High Definition, HDV and XDCAM. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Reach us at wfi @ vsnl.com and [email protected]
Views: 255 WildFilmsIndia
Monarch Life Cycle Completed
 
04:40
Very few things in life capture my passion and imagination as did this fostering of Madame Butterflies 6 baby Monarchs. Chance brought us together when she desperately expelled her eggs on the wrong host plant right before my eyes in my garden. I have waited 4 long years since releasing my first Monarch which we called Angela after the lovely lady who brought us a Monarch chrysilis to share with the children I care for. I feel that this experience connected us with the migration which Angela made to Mexico as a 3rd generation butterfly released in October 2014. This idea causes my heart to flutter and appreciate the immensity of this planet and the treasures of its existence in relation to all the creatures which share its bounty. My playlist Nature Notebook has many more treasures to view Thanks for watching
Views: 21 BUBCvision
The caterpillar is penetrating through epidermis of the leaf
 
01:00
Leaf-miner moth Stigmella sp.: Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae (on Pyrus communis - Pear)
Views: 162 Andrey Mishchenko
Growing California Goldenrod from Seeds, Days 0-58
 
12:06
Solidago is a genus of about 100-200 species of flowering plants in the aster family, Asteraceae. Most are herbaceous perennial species found in open areas such as meadows, prairies, and savannas. They are mostly native to North America; a few species are native to South America and Eurasia. Some American species have also been introduced to other parts of the world and have become invasive. The many goldenrod species can be difficult to distinguish due to their similar bright, golden-yellow flower heads that bloom in late summer. Propagation is by wind-disseminated seeds or by spreading underground rhizomes which can form colonies of vegetative clones. Young goldenrod leaves are edible. Native Americans used the seeds of some species for food. Herbal teas are sometimes made with goldenrod, or a poultice is made and applied to wounds. Goldenrod is also used in some formulas for cleansing of the kidney or bladder during a healing fast, in conjunction with potassium broth and specific juices. Some Native American cultures traditionally chew the leaves to relieve sore throats, and the roots to relieve toothaches. Goldenrod species are used as a food source by the larvae of many Lepidoptera species. The invading larva may induce the plant to form a bulbous tissue mass called a gall around it, upon which the larva then feeds. Various parasitoid wasps find these galls and lay eggs in the larvae, penetrating the bulb with their ovipositors. Woodpeckers are known to peck open the galls and eat the insects in the center. Thomas Edison experimented with goldenrod to produce rubber, which it contains naturally in only the leaves of the plant, typically at a 7% concentration. Edison created a fertilization and cultivation process to maximize the rubber content in each plant. His experiments produced a 12-foot-tall (3.7 m) plant that yielded as much as 12% rubber. The tires on the Model T given to him by his friend Henry Ford were made from goldenrod. Goldenrod rubber is of a low molecular weight though, resulting in an excessively tacky compound with poor tensile properties. California goldenrod seeds are tiny and moderately difficult to germinate, seeing as how I only got a few seedlings in my zipper bag. A variety of germination methods should work for this annual herb. This was my methodology: 1. Steam-sterilize potting mix for 1 hour on the highest heat setting for a hot plate or coils with lots of water in the pot. Use a lid. See my sterilization video for the complete process. 2. Put a suitable amount of this steamed soil (cooled down of course) in a zipper bag or container and mix in your tiny seeds thoroughly by hand to ensure that some are at the top and will sprout on the top. Add some water to ensure that the soil is soaked but not with standing water pooled at the bottom. 3. Seal the bag or container and place on an electric heat mat during winter. This is dependent on climate. If it’s warm or hot it’s probably not necessary. Mine were germinated at 20-30 Celsius, or 68-86 Fahrenheit, during February in San Diego County, California, USA within 20+ days. The seeds should be incubated in a spot that receives sunlight. 4. Transplant your seedlings to a pot or the ground. Use steam-sterilized soil if in a pot to prevent plant parasites from taking ahold. Keep your incubator bag or container for backup. 5. Water from the top every 2 days, but not deep into the pot, as the roots are still tiny in the early days.
Views: 1397 Melvin Wei
Fallen flowers of Silk Cotton Tree
 
01:22
Bombax is a genus of mainly tropical trees in the mallow family. They are native to western Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, as well as sub-tropical regions of East Asia and northern Australia. Common names for the genus include silk cotton tree, simal, red cotton tree, kapok, and simply bombax. In Chinese they are known as Mumian, meaning "tree cotton". Currently four species are recognised, although many plants have been placed in the genus that were later moved. The genus is best known for the species B. ceiba, which is widely cultivated throughout tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. It is native to southern and eastern Asia and northern Australia. Bombax species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the leaf-miner Bucculatrix crateracma which feeds exclusively on Bombax ceiba. Source: Wikipedia This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The Wilderness Films India collection comprises of tens of thousands of hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM 1080i High Definition, HDV and XDCAM. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Reach us at wfi @ vsnl.com and [email protected]
Views: 379 WildFilmsIndia
Dupont Coragen|BASF Vesticor|dhanuka cover|Chlorantraniliprole18.5% Sc|Lpatel
 
05:02
Coragen® insect control is powered by Rynaxypyr® active, a breakthrough mode of action in Group 28, delivering remarkable protection. Optimize yields and quality in your fields by achieving consistent and long-lasting control of key pests. It protects over 100 vegetable crops, as well as others such as tobacco, sweet corn, potatoes, strawberries, mint, hops and others from a broad spectrum of Lepidopteran pests, including fruitworms, bollworms, armyworms, loopers, borers, hornworms, diamondback moths, silverleaf whitefly nymphs (suppression), leafminer larvae, Colorado potato beetles and others. Coragen insect control handles immature and adult stages of key Lepidopteran pests for excellent crop protection.
Views: 20202 LPatel
Silk Cotton / Semal tree in full bloom
 
01:12
Bombax is a genus of mainly tropical trees in the mallow family. They are native to western Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, as well as sub-tropical regions of East Asia and northern Australia. Common names for the genus include silk cotton tree, simal, red cotton tree, kapok, and simply bombax. In Chinese they are known as Mumian (Chinese: 木棉; pinyin: mùmián), meaning "tree cotton". Currently four species are recognised, although many plants have been placed in the genus that were later moved.[2] The genus is best known for the species B. ceiba, which is widely cultivated throughout tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. It is native to southern and eastern Asia and northern Australia. Bombax species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the leaf-miner Bucculatrix crateracma which feeds exclusively on Bombax ceiba. Source: Wikipedia This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The Wilderness Films India collection comprises of tens of thousands of hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM 1080i High Definition, HDV and XDCAM. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Reach us at wfi @ vsnl.com and [email protected]
Views: 2476 WildFilmsIndia
Silk Cotton flowers litter the forest floor, in spring-time
 
02:59
Silk cotton tree is a type of native cotton tree with large red flowers. The genus name Salmalia is derived from the sanskrit name shaalmali. Silk cotton trees comprise eight species in the genus Bombax, native to India, tropical southern Asia, northern Australia and tropical Africa. Semul trees bear beautiful red-colored flowers during January to March. The phenomenon paints the whole landscape in an enchanting red hue. The fruit, the size of a ping-pong ball, on maturity appears during March and April. These are full of cotton-like fibrous stuff. It is for the fiber that villagers gather the semul fruit and extract the cotton substance called "kopak". This substance is used for filling economically priced pillows, quilts, sofas etc. The fruit is cooked and eaten and also pickled. Semul is quite a fast growing tree and can attain a girth of 2 to 3 m, and height about 30 m, in nearly 50 years or so. Its wood, when sawn fresh, is white in color. However, with exposure and passage of time it grows darkish gray. It is as light as 10 to 12 kg, per cubic foot. It is easy to work but not durable anywhere other than under water. So it is popular for construction work, but is very good and prized for manufacture of plywood, match boxes and sticks, scabbards, patterns, moulds, etc. Also for making canoes and light duty boats and or other structures required under water. Bombax species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the leaf-miner Bucculatrix crateracma which feeds exclusively on Bombax ceiba. Source: www.flowersofindia.net This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The collection comprises of 150, 000+ hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM / SR 1080i High Definition, Alexa, SR, XDCAM and 4K. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Please subscribe to our channel wildfilmsindia on Youtube for a steady stream of videos from across India. Also, visit and enjoy your journey across India at www.clipahoy.com , India's first video-based social networking experience! Reach us at rupindang [at] gmail [dot] com and [email protected] To SUBSCRIBE click the below link: www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=WildFilmsIndia Like & Follow Us on: Facebook: www.facebook.com/WildernessFilmsIndiaLimited Website: www.wildfilmsindia.com
Views: 515 WildFilmsIndia
Активный Паразит Птеромалюс (Pteromalidae) Хочет Больше Меда и Бабочек!
 
08:46
VIDEO LINK: https://youtu.be/4CJMPQZB-4I = = Активный Паразит Хочет скушать побольше Меда и Это Pteromalus (Pteromalidae, Chalcidoidea, Hymenoptera). = Энтомолог Виктор Николаевич Фурсов рассказывает про наездников-птеромалид. ============= Main diagnostic features of the family Pteromalidae: 1. Fore and hind tarsi 5-segmented (100%) 2. Small to very large chalcids, body slender to quite robust, from 1-48mm in length (100%) 3. Body usually metallic, often strongly so (70%) 4. Antennae 8-13 segmented (including up to 3 annelli) (100%) 5. Fully winged forms with fore wing with marginal vein at least several times longer than broad (98%), with postmarginal and stigmal vein well-developed, rarely quite short (5%); speculum distinct (99%). Included taxa: The family currently includes 588 genera and 3506 species placed in 31 subfamilies. ========= BIOLOGY: The life-histories of taxa in this family are extremely varied, and the group as a whole embraces many of the lifeways exhibited by insect parasitoids. There are solitary and gregarious species, ectoparasitoids and endoparasitoids, koinobionts and idiobionts, primary and secondary parasitoids and even predators. The majority of pteromalids are idiobionts. Many species of Pteromalidae develop as solitary or gregarious ectoparasitoids of larvae and pupae of Diptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Siphonaptera. Large numbers of species attack hosts concealed in plant tissue, such as wood-borers, stem- and leaf-miners, gall-formers etc. For example, Pteromalus sequester develops ectoparasitically on the larvae or pupae of weevils in broom pods (Parnell, 1964a). The pteromalids associated with galls develop as inquilines, feeding on the gall tissue, or as parasitoids feeding externally on larvae, pupae or even adults of the gall-former (Askew, 1961a). Other pteromalids are strictly ectoparasitoids but develop within a host puparium; for example, Cyrtogaster vulgaris is a fairly common ectoparasitoid of the pupa, within the puparium, of various species of Agromyzidae, Opomyzidae and Chloropidae (Askew, 1965), and the ubiquitous Nasonia vitripennis attacks synanthropic muscids and calliphorids in a similar way. Numerous other pteromalids are idiobiont endoparasitoids. Probably the best known of these, and most reviled by lepidopterists, is Pteromalus puparum a common endoparasitoid of various butterfly pupae, especially those of Papilionidae, Pieridae and Nymphalidae. Some pteromalids are koinobionts. For example, most species of Miscogasterini are larval-pupal endoparasitoids of agromyzids (Agromyzidae, Diptera). Species of Tomicobia sp. have unusual biology in developing as endoparasitoids of adult beetles (Coleoptera). ======================= #Pteromalus, #Hymenoptera, #Pteromalidae, #Chalcidoidea, #entomophagous, #phytophagous, #parasitic, #наездники, #parasite, #parasitoid, #ChalcidoideaUkraine, #паразиты, #паразитоиды, #энтомофаг, #фитофаг, #хальциды, #microscope, #microscopic, #microwasps, #chalcidwasps, ========================== Uploaded: 08.03.2019, Kiev, Kyiv, the capital of UKRAINE. Загружено: 08.03.2019, Киев, столица Украины \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ Welcome to Dr Victor Fursov, Channel on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ufensia/ \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ Support my Projects and my Channel – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. https://www.patreon.com/drvictorfursov Если ВЫ хотите помочь каналу, ЛИНК - https://www.patreon.com/drvictorfursov *** TO DONATE *** Options for Cooperation and Collaboration: *** 1) Western Union / Money Gram = please, contact with me by e-mail: [email protected] 2) To support my research Projects: https://www.patreon.com/drvictorfursov \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ проект5 CHALCID 07 03 2019 Parasitoid Pteromalidae Pteromalus ENGLISH 352 9m проект5 CHALCID 07 03 2019 Parasitoid Pteromalidae Pteromalus ENGLISH 352 9m проект5 CHALCID 07 03 2019 Parasitoid Pteromalidae Pteromalus ENGLISH 352 9m SUBSCRIBE TO MY VIDEO-CHANNEL = LINK = http://www.youtube.com/user/ufensia?sub_confirmation=1 VIDEO LINK: = https://youtu.be/4CJMPQZB-4I
Gladiolii and Helichrysum
 
01:07
Gladiolus is a genus of perennial cormous flowering plants in the iris family (Iridaceae).It is sometimes called the 'Sword lily', but usually by its generic name (plural gladioli). The genus occurs in Asia, Mediterranean Europe, South Africa, and tropical Africa. The center of diversity is in the Cape Floristic Region. The genera Acidanthera, Anomalesia, Homoglossum, and Oenostachys, formerly considered distinct, are now included in Gladiolus. The genus Helichrysum consists of an estimated 600 species, in the sunflower family (Asteraceae). The type species is Helichrysum orientale. The name is derived from the Greek words ἑλίσσω (helisso, to turn around) and χρῡσός (chrysos, gold). It occurs in Africa (with 244 species in South Africa), Madagascar, Australasia and Eurasia. The plants may be annuals, herbaceous perennials or shrubs, growing to a height of 60–90 cm (24–35 inches). The genus was a wastebasket taxon, and many of its members have been reclassified in smaller genera, most notably the Everlastings, now in the genus Xerochrysum. Their leaves are oblong to lanceolate. They are flat and pubescent on both sides. The bristles of the pappus are scabrous, barbellate, or plumose. The receptacle (base of the flower head) is often smooth, with a fringed margin, or honey-combed, and resemble daisies. They may be in almost all colors, except blue. There are many capitula and generally flat-topped corymbs or panicles. The corolla lobes show glandular hairs at the abaxial surface. Several species are grown as ornamental plants, and for dried flowers. When cut young and dried, the open flowers and stalks preserve their colour and shape for long periods. Helichrysum species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including the bucculaticid leaf-miners Bucculatrix gnaphaliella (which feeds exclusively on Helichrysum arenarium) and Bucculatrix helichrysella (feeds exclusively on H. italicum) and the Coleophora case-bearers C. caelebipennella, C. gnaphalii (feeds exclusively on H arenarium) and C. helichrysiella (feeds exclusively on H. italicum). Helichrysum italicum (synonym Helichrysum angustifolium) is steam distilled to produce a yellow-reddish essential oil popular in fragrance for its unique scent, best described as a mixture of burnt sugar and ham. Angustifolium means narrow leaved. The name is commonly misspelled as "augustifolium". Source :- Wikipedia This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The collection comprises of 100, 000+ hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM / SR 1080i High Definition, Alexa, SR, XDCAM and 4K. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Please subscribe to our channel wildfilmsindia on Youtube for a steady stream of videos from across India. Also, visit and enjoy your journey across India at www.clipahoy.com , India's first video-based social networking experience! Reach us at rupindang [at] gmail [dot] com and [email protected]
Views: 225 WildFilmsIndia
Timelapse of Apha Moth Larva Eating オビガ幼虫(蛾)がタニウツギの葉を蚕食:30倍速映像
 
03:48
A hairy caterpillar of moth (Apha aequalis, family Eupterotidae) voraciously devouring the green leaves of tani-utsugi (Weigela hortensis, family Caprifoliaceae). This is a 30x time-lapse movie. Early-August 2013 in Japan. They usually stay underneath a leaf of food plant to hide from predators. 日本語による詳細はブログをご覧ください。 http://sigma-nature-vlog.blogspot.jp/2013/10/blog-post_2.html タニウツギの葉を蚕食するオビガ(蛾)幼虫【微速度撮影】
Views: 133 sigma1920HD
Arctiidae courtship SB
 
00:22
Courtship behavior of arctiid moths.
Views: 272 lepidopteraresearch
Citrus Disease Mesa AZ Misshaped Leaves 480 969 8808 Warners Tree Surgery Asian Citrus Leafminer   Y
 
02:05
http://warnerstreesurgery.com (480) 969-8808 This video is about the Asian Citrus Leafminer Warner's Tree Surgery is a family business. Our business consists of my wife Pat, who manages the office and answers the phones, and me - Warner Working.
Views: 61 Warner Working